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I have a file with a double-linked-list that contains a set of process identifiers and some state information.

struct pr7_process 
{ 
  pid_t pid;        /* process ID, supplied from fork() */ 
                /* if 0, this entry is currently not in use */ 
  int   state;      /* process state, your own definition */ 
  int   exit_status;    /* supplied from wait() if process has finished */
  struct pr7_process *next;   // a pointer to the next process
  struct pr7_process *prev;
};

/* the process list */

struct process_list
{
   struct pr7_process *head;
   struct pr7_process *tail;
};

I have a method to remove an element of my list:

{
struct pr7_process *cur;
  for(cur = list->head; cur != NULL; cur = cur->next)
    {
      if (cur->pid == pid)
        {
          printf("cur pid: %d\n", cur->pid);
          cur->state = STATE_NONE;
          if(list->head == list->tail)
         {
           free(cur);
         }
         else
          {
            cur->prev->next = cur->next;
            cur->next->prev = cur->prev;
            free(cur);
          }
          break;
        }
     } 
  } 

What is wrong with my remove function? I seem to get an infinite loop when I try to print my list. Previously I thought it was the way I used free() but apparently not from the replies :)

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Usually you overcome it by using malloc to allocate everything you insert in the list. –  Jerry Coffin Apr 8 '12 at 3:27
1  
how was it assigned then? –  K Mehta Apr 8 '12 at 3:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you add a node set next to NULL.

Then when you free all, free until next == NULL.

When you remove a node. Update links and free node.

Also; free on NULL is an noop.

Valgrind is a invaluable tool when working on such things.


Believe you have to do some more checks; I.e.:

struct pr7_process {
    int pid;
    ...
} const new_proc = {
    0, 44, 0, NULL, NULL
};

void del(struct process_list *list, int pid)
{
    struct pr7_process *cur;

    for (cur = list->head; cur != NULL; cur = cur->next) {
        if (cur->pid == pid) {

            printf("cur pid: %d\n", cur->pid);

            if(list->head == list->tail) {
                free(cur);
                list->head = NULL;
                list->tail = NULL;
            } else if (cur == list->head) {
                list->head = list->head->next;
                free(cur);
                list->head->prev = NULL;
            } else if (cur == list->tail) {
                list->tail = cur->prev;
                free(cur);
                list->tail->next = NULL;
            } else {
                cur->prev->next = cur->next;
                cur->next->prev = cur->prev;
                free(cur);
            }
            break;
        }
    }
}

Given that you build the list something like i.e.:

int push(struct process_list *list, int pid, int state)
{
    if (list->head == NULL) { /* or move this to where ever you see fit */
        if ((list->head  = malloc(sizeof(struct pr7_process))) == NULL)
            return -1;
        list->tail  = list->head;
        *list->tail = new_proc;
    } else {
        if ((list->tail->next  = malloc(sizeof(struct pr7_process))) == NULL)
            return -1;
        *list->tail->next = new_proc;
        list->tail->next->prev = list->tail;
        list->tail = list->tail->next;
    }
    list->tail->pid = pid;
    list->tail->state = state;

    return 0;
}

void wipe(struct process_list *list)
{
    struct pr7_process *node = list->tail;

    while (node != list->head) {
        node = list->tail->prev;
        free(list->tail);
        list->tail = node;
    }
    free(list->head);
    list->head = NULL;
    list->tail = NULL;
}

void prnt(struct process_list list, int dir)
{
    if (dir == 1) {
        while (list.head != NULL) {
            printf("%4d: %d\n", list.head->pid, list.head->state);
            list.head = list.head->next;
        }
    } else {
        while (list.tail != NULL) {
            printf("%4d: %d\n", list.tail->pid, list.tail->state);
            list.tail = list.tail->prev;
        }
    }
}

int main(void)
{
    struct process_list list = {NULL, NULL};

    push(&list, 331, 2); /* if(push() != -1) ... */
    push(&list, 332, 66);
    push(&list, 333, 47);

    prnt(list, 1);

    del(&list, 332);
    prnt(list, 1);

    wipe(&list);
    prnt(list, 1);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

I know you cannot free() something that was not assigned by malloc, How do I overcome this?

What is there to overcome? Either something was allocated dynamically and you need to free() it, or it was allocated with automatic storage duration and you don't. There is no problem here.

Typically with a lit like this you will malloc everything so that you can reliably free things. Otherwise you don't know how they were allocated and can run into undefined behavior.

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