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here is what i am trying to do, i want to store a list of values within a db record, so it is something like this:

| id |  tags     |
| 1  |  1,3,5    |
| 2  |  121,4,6  |
| 3  |  3,101,2  |

most of the suggestion i found so far suggest creating a separate join table to establish a many-to-many relationship, but in my case, i dont think it is suitable to create a separate table because the tags values are just a list of numbers.

the best i can think of right now is to store the data as a csv string, and parse it accordingly when it is retrieved, but i'm still trying to find a way where i can get the values as an array when i retrieve it from the db, even better if i can restrict the number of elements in the list, is there any better way to do this?

I haven't decided which database to use yet, most probably postgresql, but im open to others if it can help me implement this better,

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1  
Which database are you using? –  dash1e Apr 8 '12 at 7:02
    
Whenever I had to do something like you described (which I did from time to time), I felt bad for not using a child table. Then, I added them as a string of comma-separated values. –  Uwe Keim Apr 8 '12 at 7:02
    
@dash1e, i havent decided which db to use yet, but most probably, i will be going with postgre –  that_guy Apr 8 '12 at 7:04
1  
@Uwe Keim, that is what im going to do as well, if i cant find a better way, :) –  that_guy Apr 8 '12 at 7:05
    
Are 1,2,3,4 really id's from a 'tag' table? –  Raffaele Apr 9 '12 at 6:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

On PostgreSQL you can use array type.

On MySQL you can use set type.

Then it depends on what you really need.

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awesome, didnt know that before, i guess i'll have to look more beyond ORMs... thanks! –  that_guy Apr 8 '12 at 7:17

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