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I'm having trouble getting a response from my php jquery / json / ajax. I keep combining all these different tutorials together but I still can't seem to pull it all together since no one tutorial follow what I'm trying to do.

Right now I'm trying to pass two arrays (since there's no easy way to pass associative arrays) to my jquery ajax function and just alert it out. Here's my code:

PHP

$names = array('john doe', 'jane doe');
$ids = array('123', '223');

$data['names'] = $names;
$data['ids'] = $ids;

echo json_encode($data);

Jquery

function getList(){
    $.ajax({  
        type: "GET", 
        url: 'test.php', 
        data: "",  
        complete: function(data){ 
            var test = jQuery.parseJSON(data);
            alert(test.names[0]);
            alert("here");
        }
    },
        "json");
}
getList();

In my html file all I'm really calling is my javascript file for debugging purposes. I know i'm returning an object but I'm getting an error with null values in my names section, and i'm not sure why. What am I missing?

My PHP file returns

{"names":["john doe","jane doe"],"ids":["123","223"]}

It seems to be just ending here Uncaught TypeError: Cannot read property '0' of undefined so my sub0 is killing me.

share|improve this question
    
When I try to solve these problems, I split it into two: Server-side and client-side. Step 1: Is your server returning a JSON object in the format you're expecting? Try hitting /test.php in your browser and examine the JSON response. If that looks good, then output the JSON string in your JS callback. –  jmort253 Apr 8 '12 at 7:42
1  
I think that in $.ajax you have to set dataType: 'json' instead of 'json' at end (how you do in $.get OR $.post ) –  kappa Apr 8 '12 at 7:42
    
my php file seems fine to me. How would I go about outputting my json to see how that looks besides an alert? –  Howdy_McGee Apr 8 '12 at 7:45
1  
In your debugger, Firebug or Chrome dev, visit the NET tab and look for your request. In the "Response" or "JSON" section, you can see what the server sent back to the browser. –  jmort253 Apr 8 '12 at 7:51
1  
A browser reserves the right to act funny if it doesn't get the content type when getting a php generated file (JSON, CSS, XML etc). You should always write this before your json_encode function: header('Content type: application/json'); This m –  Chad Hedgcock Apr 8 '12 at 7:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could prob use the $.getJSON facade that jQuery provides, this will setup all the required ajax params for a standard JSON request:

$.getJSON('test.php', function(response) {
    alert(response.names[0]);   // john doe
}); 

However i think the route of the issue is that 1) your server may not be returning the correct response codes and/or the correct headers (ie: JSON data) - however the above method at least for the latter should force this conclusion.

See: http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.getJSON

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah this solved my problem! –  Howdy_McGee Apr 8 '12 at 9:14
    
I thought you somehow wanted to keep $.ajax. Usually i use the $.get(....,'json') –  kappa Apr 8 '12 at 9:55
1  
+1 - This is simpler syntax. –  jmort253 Apr 8 '12 at 19:03

It looks like the problem is that you're using the complete callback instead of the success callback:

function getList(){
    $.ajax({  
        type: "GET", 
        url: 'test.php', 
        data: "",  
        success: function(data) { /* success callback */
            var test = jQuery.parseJSON(data);
            alert(test.names[0]);
            alert("here");
        }
    },
    "json");
}
getList();

From jQuery AJAX Docs:

success(data, textStatus, jqXHR)

A function to be called if the request succeeds. The function gets passed three arguments: The data returned from the server, formatted according to the dataType parameter; a string describing the status; and the jqXHR (in jQuery 1.4.x, XMLHttpRequest) object. As of jQuery 1.5, the success setting can accept an array of functions. Each function will be called in turn. This is an Ajax Event.

complete(jqXHR, textStatus)

A function to be called when the request finishes (after success and error callbacks are executed). The function gets passed two arguments: The jqXHR (in jQuery 1.4.x, XMLHTTPRequest) object and a string categorizing the status of the request ("success", "notmodified", "error", "timeout", "abort", or "parsererror"). As of jQuery 1.5, the complete setting can accept an array of functions. Each function will be called in turn. This is an Ajax Event.

share|improve this answer

jQuery wants to know what kind of data to expect as a response, otherwise it wont know how to parse it.

So, as has been said before here, you tell jQuery using the dataType = 'json' attribute.

function getList() {
    $.ajax({  
        type: "GET", 
        url: 'test.php', 
        data: "",  
        dataType: "json",
        success: function(data) { 
            console.log(data);
        }
    });
}

On top of this it is a good idea to have PHP present its content as json rather than html. You use the header for this by setting header('Content-type: application/json'); before any output in your PHP script. So:

$names = array('john doe', 'jane doe');
$ids = array('123', '223');

$data['names'] = $names;
$data['ids'] = $ids;

header('Content-type: application/json');

echo json_encode($data);
share|improve this answer
    
I'm still getting null values when I'm trying to access sub 0, I updated my question with what my PHP file outputs. –  Howdy_McGee Apr 8 '12 at 7:51
    
@Howdy_McGee even though it is working for you now, I fixed the above code and it should work with .ajax() now too. –  Mosselman Apr 8 '12 at 15:58
    
@Mosselman - I I ran an ajax call both with and without dataType: 'json', and the callback still knew how to parse it out of the box. From the jQuery Ajax Docs, dataType:'json' is helpful in cases where jQuery can't use the mime type to determine the return type. In most cases, this isn't needed. This also wasn't the problem the OP faced. OP was using the "completed" callback instead of "success". Still, I think it's a good practice to include the dataType, both as fallback and communication clarity. +1 as this is all good information. –  jmort253 Apr 8 '12 at 18:58
    
@jmort253 good to know about jquery using the mime type thanks. Hence it being a good idea to let PHP set the header then. I corrected my code to work since I had the same callback mistake, should have written the code myself. Late night coding is never a good idea. That should be the #1 tip on Stackoverflow! –  Mosselman Apr 8 '12 at 23:12
    
@Mosselman +1 for updated answer, this works for me too now :3 –  Howdy_McGee Apr 9 '12 at 2:41

You should pass all parameters for ajax() function in single object. So, there should be "dataType" option. Also, if you set data type explicitly, jQuery will parse JSON data for you. Complete callback will receive parsed JavaScript object as parameter.

function getList() {
    $.ajax({  
        type: "GET", 
        url: 'test.php', 
        data: "",  
        dataType: "json",
        success: function(test) { 
            alert(test.names[0]);
            alert("here");
        }
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good call on the dataType. However, I think the problem is that the complete callback doesn't include data from the server as the first parameter. I included a reference to the complete callback in my answer. If you change "complete" to "success", I am 100% confident your answer would be correct. –  jmort253 Apr 8 '12 at 7:50
1  
You're right. I edited my answer to fix this mistake. –  Pavel Strakhov Apr 8 '12 at 11:27
    
+1 for making your answer correct. –  jmort253 Apr 8 '12 at 18:47

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