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Imagine the following tables.

Person
    - id
    - name

Place
    - id
    - name

Coverage
    - id
    - from_person_id
    - to_person_id
    - new
    - old
    - start_date
    - end_date
    - closed

CoveragePlaces
    - id
    - coverage_id
    - place_id

The rules of the application state that a "person that is covering" for another "person" will have one record in the coverage table. The coverage table contains the "from_person_id" which is a reference to the person "covering". "to_person_id" representing another "person" who is "receiving coverage". A "person" can cover for another person from a "start_date" to an "end_date" for "old" or "new" or "all" jobs and at specific "places". No single "person" can have coverage for identical places, dates, and job status (all, old or new).

As of right now, our data is stored very similar to the above. When selecting to find people currently providing coverage for another person. We would do something like this.

SELECT
    coverage.to_user_id AS user_id
FROM
    coverage
INNER JOIN
    coverage_places
        ON ( coverage.id = coverage_places.coverage_id AND coverage_places.place_id = 10 )
WHERE
    coverage.from_user_id = 150 AND
    coverage.new = 1

Although the rules of the application state that no person can have 2 records of identical coverage. The current state of the application allows for the record to be inserted, but it overrides the existing one once outputted.

We want to change this functionality and display to the user what coverage will be replaced by their existing coverage. Since their new coverage could potentially override multiple rows.

For example, if Person A is providing coverage for Person B at place1, place2, and place3 for new jobs this entire month.

Person A is also providing coverage for Person C at place1, and place2 for all (new/old) jobs the entire month.

Then Person C decides that Person D is covering for them for the entire month at place1, and place2 in place of Person A only for old patients.

Now the application needs to detect that Person A will still be covering for Person C, but only for old patients at place, and place2.

The records for the coverage explained above (before the record for persond is entered) is below.

coverage_places
    coverage_id place_id
    1 1
    1 2
    1 3
    2 1
    2 2
coverage
    id from_user_id to_user_id
    1 1 2 
    2 1 3
places
    id name
    1 place1
    2 place2
    3 place3
person
    id name
    1 persona
    2 personb
    3 personc
    4 persond

Now the application needs to display the record that it is going to replace. If the user verifies that they want to override this coverage then the application needs to modify or delete the old coverage and insert the new coverage.

Also consider if Person A decided they wanted Person E to cover for them at place1 for old jobs for the next week.

We currently have a model very similar to the above working where a lot of logic is done on the programming end to find what coverage overlaps and display not just the record that overlaps but the pieces of that record that overlap. The code has become very complex. I have decided to step back and take a look at things to see if there may be a more simple / efficient approach.

Also bear in mind that in the future the application hopes to support dynamic fields for coverage. So i can create a new field "job pay" and have another person cover for certain pay amounts.

Any ideas or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
This is not a direct answer to your question, but it seems to me, from your description, that the fields old and new in your coverage table should rather be values for one field than seperate fields? I.e. like a field job_kind and the values old, new, all –  Vapire Apr 8 '12 at 9:18
    
I do agree that would be an improvement. We have also considered creating a job_types table with three records (old, new, all) and adding additional joins. –  Nicholas Curtis Apr 8 '12 at 9:33
    
Yes, of course. If these values are up to changing, that's the way to go... –  Vapire Apr 8 '12 at 9:39
1  
If you are planing to create dynamic fields, then I would suggest you create a separate table for those fields and insert them as values like additional_fields( id, field_name ), obviously field_name name should be unique. Now you would also need a table, that will link your record_id to field you want to use for that record. This table might have such structure additional_fields_to_records( field_id, record_id, value ). And this field_id, record_id could be a PK there. This would be my view for that step. Consider that as draft. –  Eugene Apr 8 '12 at 10:32

1 Answer 1

Since the actual cover provided seems to be for a combination of place and job type then I would look at redesigning your model to reflect that. I would suggest something like this

Person
  - id
  - name

Place
  - id
  - name

Coverage
  - id
  - from_person_id
  - to_person_id
  - coverage_type
  - place_id
  - start_date
  - end_date
  - closed

You would then have unique records for each type/place combination and substituting out one bit of cover to another coverer would be much easier.

It does mean your app might need to do some work in grouping these for display purposes (i.e. in one person is covering for another for all jobs in all places) but this would be much easier than try to break up the current data if you need to substitute out a bit of cover.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay. I think this sounds like the best approach. Yet there is a small problem, dates are also unique. Should we extract that into another table. If so would we use 30 min or hour blocks. –  Nicholas Curtis Apr 9 '12 at 0:33
    
@NicholasCurtis I don't think you would need to extract the dates into a different table as the dates directly refer to the type/place combinations. –  liquorvicar Apr 9 '12 at 9:44

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