Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i want to expand a list

[1,2,3,4]

by n

e.g. for n = 2:

[1,1,2,2,3,3,4,4]

I'm searching for the smallest possible way to achieve this without any additional librarys. Its easy to do a loop and append each item n times to a new list... but is there a other way?

share|improve this question
    
Is itertools allowed? –  jamylak Apr 8 '12 at 11:24
    
@jamylak itertools is in the standard library, so not using it would be silly. –  Lattyware Apr 8 '12 at 11:25
    
Also, how do you want this to act - in this case, it's immutable objects, but how should it act on mutable objects? –  Lattyware Apr 8 '12 at 11:25
    
by smallest did you mean the length/beauty of code or the execution time? –  Max Li Apr 8 '12 at 12:27
    
@MaxLi: code length –  Schinken Apr 10 '12 at 9:38

8 Answers 8

up vote 13 down vote accepted
>>> l = [1,2,3,4]
>>> [it for it in l for _ in range(2)]
[1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4]
share|improve this answer
2  
There is a warning here for mutable objects. If you let l equal [1, 2, [3]] then follow your method, then do test2[4].append(4) you will get [1, 1, 2, 2, [3, 4], [3, 4]]. Obviously, this won't be a problem in most cases, but worth noting. –  Lattyware Apr 8 '12 at 11:28
    
It will work in Python 2.x and 3.x - the issue is that you simply have two references to the same item, so when you update either of them, the other will update too. –  Lattyware Apr 8 '12 at 11:32

itertools [docs] to the rescue:

expanded = list(chain(*izip(*tee(l, n))))
share|improve this answer
2  
Whoa. As much as I like itertools, this is giving me a headache :) –  Tim Pietzcker Apr 8 '12 at 11:27
    
What has this got to do with itertools? –  jamylak Apr 8 '12 at 11:28
    
@TimPietzcker I found this easier to read than hamstergene's answer. –  Marcin Apr 8 '12 at 11:28
    
@jamylak where do you think izip, tee, and chain come from? –  Marcin Apr 8 '12 at 11:29
    
Oh weird sorry he edited the answer and i was looking at the old one hahahaha. –  jamylak Apr 8 '12 at 11:30

I made note of this in comments, but it's easier to explain in an answer so I can give full code examples. Please note this is more of a companion answer to others, rather than a full one in it's own right. It is simply a modification for a specific case.

If you need to do this with mutable objects, you hit a snag using the other methods presented here:

>>> l = [1,2,3,[4]]
>>> test = [it for it in l for _ in range(2)]
>>> test
[1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, [4], [4]]
>>> test[6].append(5)
>>> test
[1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, [4, 5], [4, 5]]

As such, you need to use copy.deepcopy() if you want to avoid this behaviour.

>>> import copy
>>> l = [1,2,3,[4]]
>>> test = [copy.deepcopy(it) for it in l for _ in range(2)]
>>> test
[1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, [4], [4]]
>>> test[6].append(5)
>>> test
[1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, [4, 5], [4]]

Naturally, this is only necesary for mutable objects in a list, and only if you expect them to change after creating your new list.

share|improve this answer
sum([[x]*2 for x in l],[])

where l is your list

share|improve this answer
    
So in order to repeat the elements three times, I have to write sum([[x,x,x] for x in l],[])? This seems less convenient. –  Felix Kling Apr 8 '12 at 11:41
1  
Or it can be changed to: sum([[x]*3 for x in l],[]) –  jamylak Apr 8 '12 at 11:43
    
@FelixKling: see jamylak's comment for what I left implicit in my answer. Though I guess since the OP wanted n and not 2, I think I will change that from [x,x]. –  ninjagecko Apr 8 '12 at 11:46
>>> from itertools import chain, tee
>>> x = [1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> n = 2
>>> list(chain.from_iterable(zip(*tee(x, n))))
[1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4]
share|improve this answer
1  
Why did you replicate another answer? –  Marcin Apr 8 '12 at 11:31
    
I only saw his older version like i said in the comments, I thought of this myself. Delete it if you want. –  jamylak Apr 8 '12 at 11:32
2  
@Marcin And he did provided proper imports... –  przemo_li Apr 8 '12 at 11:42

Since the author of the question answers in the comment that by "the smallest possible way" he means the smallest length of the code, I dare to post the following solution:

>>> sorted([1,2,3,4]*2)
[1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4]

It's length is 19.

share|improve this answer
>>> from itertools import repeat, chain
>>> seq = [1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> list(chain.from_iterable(repeat(x, 2) for x in seq))
[1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4]
share|improve this answer
>>> from itertools import chain
>>> seq = [1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> list(chain.from_iterable(zip(*[seq]*2)))
[1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4]
>>> list(chain.from_iterable(zip(*[seq]*6)))
[1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.