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I have a base model that I extend from. In it, I have defined two validation filters. One checks if a record is unique, the other checks if a record exists. They work the exact same way except ones return value will be the opposite of the other.

So, it doesn't sound right to write the same code twice to only return a different value. I'd like to know how I can call one custom validator from another.

Here's my code for the unique validator:

<?php
Validator::add('unique', function($value, $rule, $options) {
    $model = $options['model'];
    $primary = $model::meta('key');

    foreach ($options['conditions'] as $field => $check) {
        if (!is_numeric($field)) {
            if (is_array($check)) {
                /**
                 * array(
                 *   'exists',
                 *   'message'    => 'You are too old.',
                 *   'conditions' => array(
                 *       
                 *       'Users.age' => array('>' => '18')
                 *   )
                 * )
                 */
                $conditions[$field] = $check;
            }
        } else {
            /**
             * Regular lithium conditions array:
             * array(
             *   'exists',
             *   'message'    => 'This email already exists.',
             *   'conditions' => array(
             *       'Users.email' //no key ($field) defined
             *   )
             * )
             */
            $conditions[$check] = $value;
        }
    }

    /**
     * Checking to see if the entity exists.
     * If it exists, record exists.
     * If record exists, we make sure the record is not checked
     * against itself by matching with the primary key.
     */
    if (isset($options['values'][$primary])) {
        //primary key value exists so it's probably an update
        $conditions[$primary] = array('!=' => $options['values'][$primary]);
    }

    $exists = $model::count($conditions);
    return ($exists) ? false : true;
});
?>

exists should work like this:

<?php
Validator::add('exists', function($value, $rule, $options) {
    $model = $options['model'];
    return !$model::unique($value, $rule, $options);
});
?>

But obviously, it can't be done that way. Would I have to define the validation function as an anonymous function, assign it to a variable and pass that in instead of the closure? Or is there a way I can call unique from within exists?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The anonymous function method would work. And then you could use that variable in another anonymous function you define for the 'exists' validator. Here's another idea that incorporates it into your base model class:

<?php

namespace app\data\Model;

use lithium\util\Validator;

class Model extends \lithium\data\Model {

    public static function __init() {
        static::_isBase(__CLASS__, true);
        Validator::add('unique', function($value, $rule, $options) {
            $model = $options['model'];
            return $model::unique(compact('value') + $options);
        });
        Validator::add('exists', function($value, $rule, $options) {
            $model = $options['model'];
            return !$model::unique(compact('value') + $options);
        });
        parent::__init();
    }

    // ... code ...

    public static function unique($options) {
        $primary = static::meta('key');

        foreach ($options['conditions'] as $field => $check) {
            if (!is_numeric($field)) {
                if (is_array($check)) {
                    /**
                     * array(
                     *   'exists',
                     *   'message'  => 'You are too old.',
                     *   'conditions' => array(
                     *
                     *     'Users.age' => array('>' => '18')
                     *   )
                     * )
                     */
                    $conditions[$field] = $check;
                }
            } else {
                /**
                 * Regular lithium conditions array:
                 * array(
                 *   'exists',
                 *   'message'  => 'This email already exists.',
                 *   'conditions' => array(
                 *     'Users.email' //no key ($field) defined
                 *   )
                 * )
                 */
                $conditions[$check] = $options['value'];
            }
        }

        /**
         * Checking to see if the entity exists.
         * If it exists, record exists.
         * If record exists, we make sure the record is not checked
         * against itself by matching with the primary key.
         */
        if (isset($options['values'][$primary])) {
            //primary key value exists so it's probably an update
            $conditions[$primary] = array('!=' => $options['values'][$primary]);
        }

        $exists = $model::count($conditions);
        return ($exists) ? false : true;
    }

}

?>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @rmarscher. I see you've shortened the return line, silly me, I should have done that :) But why do you set $self in there? –  Housni Apr 10 '12 at 21:20
    
Also, you have to pass $value into the unique method because it's needed inside there. –  Housni Apr 10 '12 at 21:24
1  
Ah yeah, I think I copy and pasted setting $self by accident, because I have to do that in some of my filters to make the current object available inside the callback ($self then gets passed in via the use clause of the function definition). And I fixed the $value part. But yeah, nice solution on your part. I wouldn't have posted mine if I had refreshed the page before hitting submit. –  rmarscher Apr 13 '12 at 1:51
    
Also, +1 for using _isBase(). Actually, your code seems cleaner than mine so I'll accept it. –  Housni Apr 16 '12 at 20:01

I ended up creating a separate method that contains the functionality I need and then calling it from my validation filter. I've trimmed down my base model to hold only the relevant data in it. Hope it helps someone who has a similar problem.

<?php
namespace app\extensions\data;
class Model extends \lithium\data\Model {

    public static function __init() {
        parent::__init();

        Validator::add('unique', function($value, $rule, $options) {
            $model  = $options['model'];
            return ($model::exists($value, $rule, $options, $model)) ? false : true;
        });

        Validator::add('exists', function($value, $rule, $options) {
            $model  = $options['model'];
            return ($model::exists($value, $rule, $options, $model)) ? true : false;
        });
    }


    public static function exists($value, $rule, $options, $model) {
        $field   = $options['field'];
        $primary = $model::meta('key');

        if (isset($options['conditions']) && !empty($options['conditions'])) {
            //go here only of `conditions` are given
            foreach ($options['conditions'] as $field => $check) {
                if (!is_numeric($field)) {
                    if (is_array($check)) {
                        /**
                         *   'conditions' => array(
                         *       'Users.age' => array('>' => 18) //condition with custom operator
                         *   )
                         */
                        $conditions[$field] = $check;
                    }
                } else {
                    /**
                     * Regular lithium conditions array:
                     *   'conditions' => array(
                     *       'Users.email' //no key ($field) defined
                     *   )
                     */
                    $conditions[$check] = $value;
                }
            }
        } else {
            //since `conditions` is not set, we assume
            $modelName = $model::meta('name');
            $conditions["$modelName.$field"] = $value;
        }

        /**
         * Checking to see if the entity exists.
         * If it exists, record exists.
         * If record exists, we make sure the record is not checked
         * against itself by matching with the primary key.
         */
        if (isset($options['values'][$primary])) {
            //primary key value exists so it's probably an update
            $conditions[$primary] = array('!=' => $options['values'][$primary]);
        }

        return $model::count($conditions);
    }
}
?>
share|improve this answer
    
Ha... I drafted the above answer last night, but forgot to hit submit. I just hit submit and now I see your answer. But yeah, same thing. –  rmarscher Apr 10 '12 at 20:56

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