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I had changes. I stashed. I updated. I stash popped. There was a conflict. I believe I did git add style.css again. Then I did git commit -m "stuff" style.css and it worked. I can see my changes in the log.


> git status
    #   modified:   style.css
    # Changed but not updated:
    #   modified:   style.css

> git checkout -- style.css 
    error: path 'style.css' is unmerged

> git reset HEAD style.css 
    Unstaged changes after reset:
    M   style.css
    U   style.css

> git ls-files -u 
    100644 cf84f92ca42b4a922eca50e18678450f8b37 3   style.css

> git reset --hard HEAD
    ... it hangs and locks up my computer, and have to force quit terminal ...

> git fsck
    dangling blob 1983b7e295f163ce1458ed1dfe57dca686a46
    dangling blob 8d922d3aeb3f9eed5a9469fd2de432d3fee9f
    dangling commit de0ea03d25293e353b0a7693d10ed24c9940f
    dangling blob a660abd6e159149d6475506e5d5f17fcd71d7
    dangling blob 42b0250d914fa2fa7e0d8194739cf99e47bdf

It appeans that git reset --hard HEAD starts eating through my disk space. I can watch activity monitor show the free disk space go from several gb to 200 mb and then it tells me I have to close applications.

Any ideas?

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Why is the path different in the third line? (git reset HEAD <unmerged-file> is definitely the first thing I'd try, so I'm mostly wondering if you're actually using it on the right file.) –  Jefromi Apr 8 '12 at 15:28
Also, git reset --hard obviously shouldn't "lock up" your computer (is it taking up all the memory then swapping?) so you might also want to do some sanity checks: run git fsck, run a disk check, and make sure you're not using an old version of git (just in case there's some obscure bug you're hitting). –  Jefromi Apr 8 '12 at 15:35
i was just removing the path for clarity, forgot to remove it there. edited. –  Andy Ray Apr 8 '12 at 19:47
when i get into git hell i git reset --hard HEAD and if that dosn't work I try and just create a new repository directory and start again (if it's an option). –  Michael Durrant Apr 8 '12 at 20:24
I was able to fix it by doing git checkout -f master; git checkout branchname –  Andy Ray Apr 8 '12 at 20:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

So unless someone proposes something else, the only way I was able to fix this was git checkout -f master then git checkout branchname

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