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How can I compare multiple input field values and if there is a match alert 'There are similar values' using jQuery?

<input value="111"> //similar
<input value="222">
<input value="111"> //similar
<input value="333">

This html code above should alert 'There are similar values', as it has 2 values which are the same. How can it be done with jQuery?

My tried(Following code doesn't work):

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/HpWLQ/

$('input').each(function () {
    var $this = $(this);
    var val = $this.val();
    vals.push(val);
});
for (var i = 0; i < vals.length; i++) {
    for (var n = 0; n < vals.length; n++) {
        if (n !== i) {
            if (vals[i] === vals[n]) {
                alert('There are similar values');
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
What have you try? –  Alexander Apr 8 '12 at 12:18
    

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Edit: In order to satisfy @Raynos, here's a pure JS solution.

var vals = {};
var flag = false;
var collection = document.getElementsByTagName('input');
collection = [].slice.call(collection);

collection.forEach(function(element, index, array) {
    if (flag === true) return;
    var i = element.value;
    if (vals[i])
    {
        flag = true;
        alert('There are duplicates!');
    }
    else
    { 
        vals[i] = 1;
    }
});


Bonus: I ran my solutions through jsperf; the last one is obviously by far the fastest.

Edit: Here's what would probably be the jQuery way of solving your problem (Working fiddle here). My original answer remains below.

var duplicatefound = false;
$('input').each(function(index, item){
    if (duplicatefound) return;
    val = $(item).val();
    if ($('input[value="' + val + '"]').length == 1) return;
    duplicatefound = true;
    alert('There are similar values');
});

​ Alternative solution in case you need to capture some or all of the duplicate values (Working fiddle here):

var collection = $('input');
var duplicates = $.map(collection, function(item){
    val = $(item).val();
    return ($('input[value="' + val + '"]').length > 1) ? val : null;
});

if(duplicates.length > 0) alert('There are similar values');

As others have mentioned, you were missing a declaration of vals as an array, therefore, .push() was failing.

You might find an object based solution to be more elegant: Working fiddle

var vals = {};

$('input').each(function() {
    var index = $(this).val();
    if (vals[index])
    {
        vals[index]++
    }
    else
    { 
        vals[index] = 1;
    }
});

var duplicates = $.map(vals, function(val, key){
    return (val > 1) ? key : null;
});

if (duplicates.length > 0) alert('There are duplicates!');
share|improve this answer
    
The phrase "the fastest" in combination with jQuery is worth a downvote. The fastest solution is to always not use jQuery –  Raynos Apr 8 '12 at 14:47
    
@Raynos I stated quite clearly that I jsperf'd my solutions. Of those, #3 was the fastest. Of course, not using jQuery at all would be faster. –  vzwick Apr 8 '12 at 14:50
    
It's a tongue in cheek joke. The real downvote is for promoting code like $('input[value="' + val + '"]') which is horrible –  Raynos Apr 8 '12 at 14:52
    
@Raynos Oh, c'mon. Let's not get into pseudoreligious arguments about jQuery usage. –  vzwick Apr 8 '12 at 14:56
1  
The issue here is that we've not only created ugly code which is hard to read (or pass to someone else, like the people you want to answer a question), as well as maintain in a year, BUT we've also made a poor choice for how to locate things in the DOM. Unfortunately, we can't explain why this is terrible for working with the DOM in the comment boxes or on a Q&A site (I've tried, I nearly wrote a book in one answer, and it wasn't even complete). The best I can say is check out Mozilla Developer Network's guides on HTML/DOM/JS. –  Incognito Apr 8 '12 at 15:06

You haven't defined the vals to be an array. You can define it like

vals = [];

Demo

share|improve this answer
var inputs = $("input"), similar = [], i, j;

for (i = 0; i < inputs.length; i += 1) {
    for (j = i + 1; j < inputs.length; j += 1) {
        if (inputs[i].value === inputs[j].value) {
            similar.push([i,j]);
        }
    }
}

if (similar.length > 0) {
    alert('There are similar values');
}​

Note that the this only compares unique permutations in order, and it gives you an array of matching indices in the similar array, in case this is interesting to you.

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/sjCGy/

You could just as easily remove the jQuery dependency using document.getElementsByTagName instead of the jQuery selector.

And since @Raynos can't read, I'll make it explicit.

var inputs = document.getElementsByTagName("input"), similar = [], i, j;

for (i = 0; i < inputs.length; i += 1) {
    for (j = i + 1; j < inputs.length; j += 1) {
        if (inputs[i].value === inputs[j].value) {
            similar.push([i,j]);
        }
    }
}

if (similar.length > 0) {
    alert('There are similar values');
}​
share|improve this answer
    
-1 for not using document.getElementsByTagName –  Raynos Apr 8 '12 at 14:16
1  
Did you actually read the answer? –  Matt Esch Apr 8 '12 at 14:25

Your code works, you are just missing the declaration of the vals array - See updated fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
I don't mean to be holier than the pope, but a) you're iterating over each input, redeclaring vals to an empty array on every iteration b) you're checking for matches on every iteration, which is less than efficient. –  vzwick Apr 8 '12 at 12:38
    
@vzwick Yeah, you're right. Don't know what I was thinking with that one. –  Rory McCrossan Apr 8 '12 at 12:40
EDITED 2:    

function findDuplicates()
{
    var dupCount = 0;
    $('input').each(function () {
         var $currentInput = $(this);
         $('input').each(function () {
              if($(this).val() == $currentInput.val() && $(this) != $currentInput)
                   dupCount++;
         });
     });
     if(dupCount > 0) alert("There are " + dupCount + "duplicates!");
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Try running this on a set with just one duplicate, not to mention multiple ones ;) jsfiddle.net/pxp9n/5 There's plenty of alerts due to excessive iteration. You should set a flag if there was any duplicate and return early in the first each if that flag is true: jsfiddle.net/pxp9n/7 –  vzwick Apr 8 '12 at 13:14
    
Yes, you are right, that piece of code wasn't the best. –  Michael Apr 8 '12 at 15:31

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