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The XPath bookstore/book[1] selects the first book node under bookstore.

How can I select the first node that matches a more complicated condition, e.g. the first node that matches /bookstore/book[@location='US']

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4 Answers 4

up vote 99 down vote accepted

use

/bookstore/book[@location='US'][1]

This will first get the book elements with the location attribute equal to 'US'. Then it will select the first node from that set

(note this is not the same as

/bookstore/book[1][@location='US']

unless the first element also happens to have that location attribute )

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How I could do same for //bookstore/book[@location='US'] ? –  Alexander V. Ilyin Mar 11 '11 at 19:04
5  
This will get all books from 'US'. (/bookstore/book[@location='US'])[1] will get the first one. –  Kevin Driedger Apr 17 '12 at 19:39
2  
@KevinDriedger /bookstore/book[@location='US'][1] does not return all books from 'US'. I have tested it mutiple times and under different languages' xpath implementations. /bookstore/book[@location='US'][1] returns the first 'US' book under a bookstore. If there are mutiple bookstores, then it will return the first from each. This is what the OP asked for (the first node under bookstore). Your version returns only one book from all bookstores (the first match). –  Jonathan Fingland Apr 18 '12 at 18:38

/bookstore/book[@location='US'][1] works only with simple structure.

Add a bit more structure and things break.

With

<bookstore>
 <category>
  <book location="US">A1</book>
  <book location="FIN">A2</book>
 </category>
 <category>
  <book location="FIN">B1</book>
  <book location="US">B2</book>
 </category>
</bookstore> 

/bookstore/category/book[@location='US'][1] yields

<book location="US">A1</book>
<book location="US">B2</book>

not "the first node that matches a more complicated condition". /bookstore/category/book[@location='US'][2] returns nothing.

With parentheses you can get the result the original question was for:

(/bookstore/category/book[@location='US'])[1] gives

<book location="US">A1</book>

and (/bookstore/category/book[@location='US'])[2] works as expected.

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16  
This should be accepted answer! I can't understand how accepted answer got so much upvotes... It doesn't work at all when it comes to more complicated cases... –  korda Apr 13 '12 at 14:27
7  
Author of the accepted answer here. The OP 's question regarded /bookstore/book[1] and NOT (/bookstore/book)[1]. The case you've provided is not the same as the one OP asked for. Presumably, OP accepted my answer as it did what he expected (and requested). –  Jonathan Fingland Apr 18 '12 at 18:47
    
This answer provided helped me for this peculiar case. Can someone explain why it won't handle "more complicated situations"? Since basically it does find a list with two items, the [2] should just pick it up (in my world) –  Skurpi May 11 '12 at 9:01
2  
Parentheses works! You can also add more path after (..)[1], like: '(//div[text() = "'+ name +'"])[1]/following-sibling::*/div/text()'. In case there are many nodes matches name. –  Hlung Dec 18 '12 at 10:57
1  
+1 for parentheses. I disagree @GerardONeill - this was the only answer that solved my issue. –  w5m Nov 5 '13 at 15:47

As an explanation to Jonathan Fingland's answer:

  • multiple conditions in the same predicate ([position()=1 and @location='US']) must be true as a whole
  • multiple conditions in consecutive predicates ([position()=1][@location='US']) must be true one after another
  • this implies that [position()=1][@location='US'] != [@location='US'][position()=1]
    while [position()=1 and @location='US'] == [@location='US' and position()=1]
  • hint: a lone [position()=1] can be abbreviated to [1]

You can build complex expressions in predicates with the Boolean operators "and" and "or", and with the Boolean XPath functions not(), true() and false(). Plus you can wrap sub-expressions in parentheses.

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4  
This would be an alternative to the 2nd xpath code snippet, which Jonathan Fingland noted wouldn't yield the same results. The original post asked for the first node that matched the attrib, but this xpath returns a node if it's the first node and it has that attrib match. –  mirezus Jan 28 '10 at 15:50
    
@alram: This is true. Thanks for the hint, I've modified my answer to be more clear on this point. –  Tomalak Jan 28 '10 at 16:35
    
Tomalak, your notes are more clear, but your answer is still wrong. The correct answer is buried as the second selector in bullet point 3 ([@location='US'][position()=1]). Which as you pointed out refactors down to Johnathan Fingland's answer. You cannot use the 'and' with this answer. –  Gerard ONeill Aug 27 '13 at 21:01
1  
@Gerard You are absolutely right. I've removed the misleading bit and made my answer strictly an explanatory one (as it is not technically wrong, but only contextually). Thanks for notifying me! –  Tomalak Aug 27 '13 at 21:17

The easiest way to find first english book node (in the whole document), taking under consideration more complicated structered xml file, like:

<bookstore>
 <category>
  <book location="US">A1</book>
  <book location="FIN">A2</book>
 </category>
 <category>
  <book location="FIN">B1</book>
  <book location="US">B2</book>
 </category>
</bookstore> 

is xpath expression:

/descendant::book[@location='US'][1]

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