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All, recently i tried to use the new features supported by c++11, and i wrote such statement however the compiler ran failed.

auto x = 1;

the report error listed below:

D:\DEV\CBCppTest\main.cpp||In function 'int main()':|
D:\DEV\CBCppTest\main.cpp|22|warning: 'auto' changes meaning in C++11; please remove it [-Wc++0x-compat]|
D:\DEV\CBCppTest\main.cpp|22|error: 'x' does not name a type|
||=== Build finished: 1 errors, 1 warnings ===|

Why the last gcc version 4.7.0 on MinGW cannot support the this statement. But the compiler of vs10 passed. Could anyone know the reason for this issue?

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5 Answers

"GCC provides experimental support for the 2011 ISO C++ standard. This support can be enabled with the -std=c++11 or -std=gnu++11 compiler options; the former disables GNU extension."

It comes from here: c+11 support

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thanks, it puzzled me for a long time. –  Roger Luo Apr 8 '12 at 15:20
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When compiling, you need to add -std=c++11 to g++ command line.

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This is due to the feature not being enable by default by the GCC compiler. If you're on Codeblocks, go to Settings --> Compiler and enable the feature as shown - http://imgur.com/KrHx8nh

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To explain what the compiler is actually complaining about: auto used to be an old C keyword, declaring that this variable has automatic storage. These keywords have little to do with the type system, they specify how variable are represented in memory: where they're stored (processor register vs. main memory / stack) and how the memory is reclaimed. auto means the variable is stored on the stack (though the processor may optimise it into a processor register) and the memory is automatically reclaimed when the variable goes out of scope – which is the right choice in almost any situation1 and thus the default, so virtually nobody ever used this old auto keyword. Yet C++03 still provided backwards compatibility for code that has it; today's compilers still want to support legacy code.


1Though often you want objects to reside on the heap, you'll still be accessing those through variables on the stack; C++ has its own methods of using heap-allocated memory (new, std::vector etc.), you don't need the unsafe C-style malloc stuff.

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For me adding "-std=c++0x"" to g++ command line fixed the issue.

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