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I have a 2D array with size 4 (4 rows). To make the array size 2 (2 rows), can I use following? (for our hw assignment details are not specified and the code should be suitable with common c++ standarts)

I am removing second half of the array.

const int newSize = flightsArraySize/2;
for(int i = newSize-1; i < flightsArraySize-1; i++)
   delete [] flights[i];

Or do I have to recreate flights array with size 2?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Supposing that you have created a 2D array using new like this:

int **arr = new int*[rows];
for(int i=0; i<rows; ++i)
    arr[i] = new int[cols];

Then to resize it you'd have to do something like:

int newRows = rows/2;

// Create a new array for the right number of rows.
int **newArr = new int*[newRows];

// Copy the rows we're keeping across.
for(int i=0; i<newRows; ++i)
    newArr[i] = arr[i];

// Delete the rows we no longer need.
for(int i=newRows; i<rows; ++i)
    delete[] arr[i];

// Delete the old array.
delete[] arr;

// Replace the old array and row count with the new ones.
arr = newArr;
rows = newRows;

But seriously, this is all so much easier if you just use vector:

std::vector<std::vector<int>> v(rows);
for(int i=0; i<rows; ++i)
    v[i].resize(cols);
v.resize(v.size()/2);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the effort. I have to use array. It's a pain in the.. for a big project – user1055645 Apr 8 '12 at 19:49

Well, it deallocates the memory on which pointed the second half of pointers. But the poiters themselves will stay, the array of pointers will not be shortened.

EDIT

Oh, sorry. It seems as a mistake. If you have code like this:

int **ptr = new int*[4];

for(int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
{
    ptr[i] = new int[4];
}

Then when you type

delete[] ptr[3];

It will delete the whole array, so you can create new like this:

ptr[3] = new int[any_number];

Is this what you mean? Sorry, I read too fast...

share|improve this answer
    
Then I should recreate flights array? – user1055645 Apr 8 '12 at 18:06
    
I have specified the answer, it seems I read too fast :-) basically, if you have array of pointers and every this pointer points to an array of values, then you can delete[] the pointer and the array completely disappears. Than you can 'new' it again. – Mimars Apr 8 '12 at 18:14

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