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Today I was writing an program in C# and I used % to calculate some index... my program did't work so I debuged it and I realized that "%" is not working like in other program languages that I know.

For example:

in python % returns values like this:

for x in xrange (-5, 6):
     print x, "% 5 =", x % 5

-5 % 5 = 0
-4 % 5 = 1
-3 % 5 = 2
-2 % 5 = 3
-1 % 5 = 4
0 % 5 = 0
1 % 5 = 1
2 % 5 = 2
3 % 5 = 3
4 % 5 = 4
5 % 5 = 0

in C#:

for (int i = -5; i < 6; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine(i + " % 5 = " + i % 5);
}

-5 % 5 = 0
-4 % 5 = -4
-3 % 5 = -3
-2 % 5 = -2
-1 % 5 = -1
0 % 5 = 0
1 % 5 = 1
2 % 5 = 2
3 % 5 = 3
4 % 5 = 4
5 % 5 = 0

My question is:

Did I done something wrong or % is not working like it should?

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27  
In C-derived languages, % is not the modulus operator. It is the remainder operator. Eric Lippert explains. –  Raymond Chen Apr 8 '12 at 18:08
7  
@RaymondChen that looks like an answer, not a comment. I can upvote it if you want, though. –  Mr Lister Apr 8 '12 at 18:14
1  
How can I use modulus operator in C#? –  Wolfy Apr 8 '12 at 19:14
3  
Wolfy - just add 5 if the value is negative. –  Cheeso Apr 8 '12 at 19:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

As explained in the comments, the different behaviour is by design. The different languages just ascribe different meanings to the % operator.

You ask:

How can I use modulus operator in C#?

You can define a modulus operator yourself that behaves the same was as the Python % operator:

int mod(int a, int n)
{
    int result = a % n;
    if ((a<0 && n>0) || (a>0 && n<0))
        result += n;
    return result;
}
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3  
Your code gives incorrect results, for example mod(-5, 5) == 5. For a working example, see this answer –  Drake Jul 20 '13 at 23:04

Both answers are correct. Although personally I think the "always positive" one makes more sense.

You can define your own modulus function that only gives positive answers like this:

int mod(int a, int n) {
    return ((a%n)+n) % n;
}
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1  
what does mod(-5, 2) return? –  David Heffernan Apr 8 '12 at 19:32
    
Damn... Okay, let me try again. –  Niet the Dark Absol Apr 8 '12 at 19:49
    
mod(-2, -5) returns -2. You said that it should return always positive values, but there are inputs which cause it to return negative values. Is this acceptable? Is it expected? –  Eric Lippert Apr 9 '12 at 17:04

In modular arithmetic, one defines classes of numbers based on the modulo. In other words, in modulo m arithmetic, a number n is equivalent (== the same) to n + m, n - m, n + 2m, n - 2m... etc.

One defines m "baskets", and every number falls in one (and only one) of them.

Example: one can say "It's 4:30pm" or one can say "It's 16:30". Both forms mean exactly the same time, but are different representations of it.

Thus — both the python and C# results are correct! The numbers are the same in the modulo 5 arithmetic you chose. It would also have been mathematically correct to return (5, 6, 7, 8, 9) for example. Just a bit odd.

As for the choice of representation (in other words, the choice on how to represent negative numbers), that is just a case of different design choices between the two languages.

However, that is not at all what the % operator actually does in C#. The % operator is not the canonical modulus operator, it is the remainder operator. The A % B operator actually answer the question "If I divided A by B using integer arithmetic, what would the remainder be?"

What's the difference? Remainder vs Modulus by Eric Lippert


Quick snippet to get the canonical modulus

return ((n % m) + m) % m;

Test:

imac:~ sklivvz$ cat mod.cs 
using System;

public class Program
{
    public static void Main (string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(Mod(-2, 5));
        Console.WriteLine(Mod(-5, 5));
        Console.WriteLine(Mod(-2, -5));    
    }

    public static int Mod (int n, int m)
    {
        return ((n % m) + m) % m;
    }
}
imac:~ sklivvz$ mono mod.exe
3
0
-2
imac:~ sklivvz$ cat mod.py
print -2%5;
print -5%5;
print -2%-5;
imac:~ sklivvz$ python mod.py 
3
0
-2
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1  
What is the "canonical modulus" of -2 and -5? Your program gives -2, but I think you were intending it to give non-negative results. Care to try again? –  Eric Lippert Apr 9 '12 at 13:51
    
@EricLippert It does not. It returns 3 and 0, respectively. See my edit. –  Sklivvz Apr 9 '12 at 16:53
1  
I assure you, your snippet says that the canonical modulus of -2 and -5 is -2. Try it: class P { static void Main() { int n = -2, m = -5; System.Console.WriteLine(((n%m)+m)%m)); } } Run that, you'll get -2 printed out. If it was your intention that the canonical modulus be non-negative, you have failed to achieve your intention. Care to try again? –  Eric Lippert Apr 9 '12 at 16:58
    
@Eric Ah, gotcha! -5 was the modulo and not another input... OK, that's still consistent with python, though: python -c 'print -2%-5;' returns -2. That's what the OP was expecting, I think. –  Sklivvz Apr 9 '12 at 17:13

Check table on the right side: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modulo_operation

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