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Edit: I've resolved my problem. The cause was an error in testing procedure and will be detailed once I'm allowed to answer my own question.

I know this type of question should generally be avoided, but I've come across a really strange situation that I can't make sense of. I've been trying to implement a PRNG, and I've been testing its performance against System.Random. I found that my code was ~50 times slower, but it wasn't the algorithm that was the problem, but just calling the method. Even if I just returned a constant, it would still be many times slower.

So I write a simple test program that compares calling a method that wraps random.NextDouble(), a method that returns -1, and calling random.NextDouble() directly. I ran my test in Ideone, and it gave the expected results; all the times were similar, and returning a constant was fastest. The times were all around 0.1 seconds.

However, the same code compiled in Visual Studio 2011 Beta or 2010 C# Express would result in 4 seconds, 4 seconds, and 0.1 seconds, for each case respectively. I'm definitely running in release mode, the optimize code checkbox is ticked, and launching from outside Visual Studio gives the same results. So why are such simple method calls so much slower in Visual Studio than Ideone? Here's the code I used to benchmark:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;

public class Test{
    static Random random = new Random();

    public static Double Random() {
        return random.NextDouble();
    }

    public static Double Random2() {
        return -1;
    }

    public static void Main() {
        {
            Stopwatch s = new Stopwatch();
            Double a = 0;
            s.Start();
            for (Int32 i = 0; i < 5000000; i++)
                a += Random();
            s.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine(s.ElapsedMilliseconds);
        }

        {
            Stopwatch s = new Stopwatch();
            Double a = 0;
            s.Start();
            for (Int32 i = 0; i < 5000000; i++)
                a += Random2();
            s.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine(s.ElapsedMilliseconds);
        }

        {
            Stopwatch s = new Stopwatch();
            Double a = 0;
            s.Start();
            for (Int32 i = 0; i < 5000000; i++)
                a += random.NextDouble();
            s.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine(s.ElapsedMilliseconds);
        }
    }
}
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2  
Sorry for the stupid question but what is PRNG? –  sll Apr 8 '12 at 19:34
2  
PseudoRandom Number Generator. –  Mark Byers Apr 8 '12 at 19:34
2  
You also need to s.Reset() the stopwatch because otherwise it resumes from previous count. –  ja72 Apr 8 '12 at 19:38
1  
@ja72 You can see that I initialized a new Stopwatch for each case by separating the blocks with brackets. –  Kira Chow Apr 8 '12 at 19:40
1  
No need to call s.Reset() @ja72 --- he's using the braces for scoping, so there's actually 3 different stopwatches. On a side note, you should really put that block into its own method.... –  debracey Apr 8 '12 at 19:41
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1 Answer 1

You shouldn't measure the first call to Random() and Random2(). The first time a function is called, it is handled by the JITTER. Instead, call Random() and Random2() once, then start measuring. random.NextDouble() was already compiled after .NET was installed, so it doesn't suffer from the same problem.

I don't believe this will explain all the difference, but it should level the playing field.

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I just wrapped the code in a for loop so it would run 10 times. The results are consistent with my original findings. –  Kira Chow Apr 8 '12 at 20:09
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