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I'm using a singleton for granting a unique copy of each object in runtime:

Car object1= CarFactory.createCar(id);

where the createCar method is:

private static ArrayList<Car> cars= new ArrayList<Car>();

public static synchronized Car createCar(int id){
   Car result= new Car(id);
   int index= cars.indexOf(result);
   if (index==-1){
      cars.add(result);
      return result;
   } else {
      return cars.get(index);
   }
}

The problem is that with this method each Car have always an reference due to the "cars" collection and the object's memory is never released. How can I improve it?

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1  
Shouldn't cars be static? –  Jeffrey Apr 8 '12 at 19:49
    
Yes it was an transcript error –  Addev Apr 8 '12 at 19:51
    
The first thing I'd do is remove the mutable statics. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Apr 8 '12 at 19:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use a WeakReference to wrap the objects before putting them in the list. Example:

private static List<WeakReference<Car>> cars = new ArrayList<WeakReference<Car>>();

public static synchronized Car createCar(int id) {
   WeakReference<Car> result= new WeakReference<Car>(new Car(id));
   int index= cars.indexOf(result);
   if (index==-1){
      cars.add(result);
      return result.get();
   } else {
      return cars.get(index).get();
   }
}

Note: This is not production code. You will have to build some more safeguards before using it.

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issue: WeakReference.equals doesn't check what it references so index will always be -1, use a iterator loop instead (and remove the weakrefs that have already been collected) –  ratchet freak Apr 8 '12 at 20:17
    
@ratchetfreak As I said: Definitely not production code.. :-) –  nfechner Apr 9 '12 at 7:23

I suppose you could keep a list of WeakReferences. A weak reference is not strong enough to keep an object from being garbage collected.

Ex:

    List<WeakReference<Point>> list = new ArrayList<>();
    Point p = new Point();
    list.add(new WeakReference<>(p));
    System.out.println(p);
    System.out.println(list.get(0).get());

    p = null;

    System.gc();
    System.gc();
    System.gc();
    System.gc(); // hopefully the GC collects p by now

    System.out.println(list.get(0).get()); // null!

However, unless you're creating a large number of Cars and memory is actually an issue, it is probably not worth the trouble.

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it's a bit of a hack but you can use

WeakHashMap<Car,WeakReference<Car>> cars=new WeakHashMap<Car,WeakReference<Car>>();

public static synchronized Car createCar(int id){
   Car result= new Car(id);
   WeakReference<Car> weakCar=cars.get(result);
   if(weakCar==null){
       cars.put(new WeakReference(result));
       return result;
   }
   Car val= weakCar.get();
   if (val==null){//it may have been collected between cars.get() and weakCar.get()
      cars.put(new WeakReference(result));
      return result;
   } else {
      return val;
   }
}

note that you need the weakref as value because the value is considered a strong ref

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer but it doesn't work because cars.get(result) returns always run (even overriding equals method at Car) –  Addev Apr 8 '12 at 20:43
    
@Addev did you also override Car's hashcode() (just return id) –  ratchet freak Apr 8 '12 at 20:47

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