Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose I have a string char* str. I print it to the buffer in the following way:

char buf[MAX_LEN];
freopen("tmp","w",stdout);
printf("%s\n",str);
fflush(stdout);
fp = fopen(tmp,"r");
if (fp == NULL) return;
fgets(buf,MAX_LEN,fp);
fclose(fp);
fclose(stdout);

May this code cause invalid stream buffer handle? Is it legal to use freopen and after it fopen? Based on constrains of my system I can't use fprintf and sprintf.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

In theory, it's perfectly legal and works fine. It's even its main use case, according to its man page :

The freopen() function opens the file whose name is the string pointed to by path and associates the stream pointed to by stream with it. The original stream (if it exists) is closed. The mode argument is used just as in the fopen() function. The primary use of the freopen() function is to change the file associated with a standard text stream (stderr, stdin, or stdout)

In practice, your code won't work : there are some mistake mainly between "tmp" and tmp & missing headers. This code will :

#include <stdio.h>
#define MAX_LEN 512

int main() {
  const char* str = "data\n";
  FILE* fp;
  char buf[MAX_LEN];

  freopen("tmp","w",stdout);
  printf("%s\n",str);
  fflush(stdout);
  fp = fopen("tmp","r");
  if (fp == NULL) return;
  fgets(buf,MAX_LEN,fp);
  // here, buf gets str's content 
  fclose(fp);
  fclose(stdout);
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Also, while @Yakov is unlikely to run into this, there are (or at least were) systems where if you have a file open for writing, it's automatically "locked" for reading. In that case you will generally get NULL back from the attempt to fopen-for-reading. This is ... annoying. I try to avoid these systems. :-) –  torek Apr 8 '12 at 21:37
1  
@Coren - it is obvious about header.There was no need to duplicate my code –  Yakov Apr 9 '12 at 4:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.