Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm following a tutorial, but when it comes to compiling and linking the code I get the following error:

/tmp/cc8gRrVZ.o: In function `main':
main.c:(.text+0xa): undefined reference to `monitor_clear'
main.c:(.text+0x16): undefined reference to `monitor_write'
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status
make: *** [obj/main.o] Error 1

What that is telling me is that I haven't defined both 'monitor_clear' and 'monitor_write'. But I have, in both the header and source files.

They are as follows:

monitor.c:

// monitor.c -- Defines functions for writing to the monitor.
//             heavily based on Bran's kernel development tutorials,
//             but rewritten for JamesM's kernel tutorials.

#include "monitor.h"

// The VGA framebuffer starts at 0xB8000.
u16int *video_memory = (u16int *)0xB8000;
// Stores the cursor position.
u8int cursor_x = 0;
u8int cursor_y = 0;

// Updates the hardware cursor.
static void move_cursor()
{
    // The screen is 80 characters wide...
    u16int cursorLocation = cursor_y * 80 + cursor_x;
    outb(0x3D4, 14);                  // Tell the VGA board we are setting the high cursor byte.
    outb(0x3D5, cursorLocation >> 8); // Send the high cursor byte.
    outb(0x3D4, 15);                  // Tell the VGA board we are setting the low cursor byte.
    outb(0x3D5, cursorLocation);      // Send the low cursor byte.
}

// Scrolls the text on the screen up by one line.
static void scroll()
{

    // Get a space character with the default colour attributes.
    u8int attributeByte = (0 /*black*/ << 4) | (15 /*white*/ & 0x0F);
    u16int blank = 0x20 /* space */ | (attributeByte << 8);

    // Row 25 is the end, this means we need to scroll up
    if(cursor_y >= 25)
    {
        // Move the current text chunk that makes up the screen
        // back in the buffer by a line
        int i;
        for (i = 0*80; i < 24*80; i++)
        {
            video_memory[i] = video_memory[i+80];
        }

        // The last line should now be blank. Do this by writing
        // 80 spaces to it.
        for (i = 24*80; i < 25*80; i++)
        {
            video_memory[i] = blank;
        }
        // The cursor should now be on the last line.
        cursor_y = 24;
        }
    }

    // Writes a single character out to the screen.
    void monitor_put(char c)
    {
        // The background colour is black (0), the foreground is white (15).
        u8int backColour = 0;
        u8int foreColour = 15;

        // The attribute byte is made up of two nibbles - the lower being the 
        // foreground colour, and the upper the background colour.
        u8int  attributeByte = (backColour << 4) | (foreColour & 0x0F);
        // The attribute byte is the top 8 bits of the word we have to send to the
        // VGA board.
        u16int attribute = attributeByte << 8;
        u16int *location;

        // Handle a backspace, by moving the cursor back one space
        if (c == 0x08 && cursor_x)
        {
            cursor_x--;
        }

        // Handle a tab by increasing the cursor's X, but only to a point
        // where it is divisible by 8.
        else if (c == 0x09)
        {
              cursor_x = (cursor_x+8) & ~(8-1);
        }

        // Handle carriage return
        else if (c == '\r')
        {
            cursor_x = 0;
        }

       // Handle newline by moving cursor back to left and increasing the row
       else if (c == '\n')
       {
            cursor_x = 0;
            cursor_y++;
       }
       // Handle any other printable character.
       else if(c >= ' ')
       {
           location = video_memory + (cursor_y*80 + cursor_x);
           *location = c | attribute;
           cursor_x++;
       }

       // Check if we need to insert a new line because we have reached the end
       // of the screen.
       if (cursor_x >= 80)
       {
           cursor_x = 0;
           cursor_y ++;
       }

       // Scroll the screen if needed.
       scroll();
       // Move the hardware cursor.
       move_cursor();

}

// Clears the screen, by copying lots of spaces to the framebuffer.
void monitor_clear()
{
    // Make an attribute byte for the default colours
    u8int attributeByte = (0 /*black*/ << 4) | (15 /*white*/ & 0x0F);
    u16int blank = 0x20 /* space */ | (attributeByte << 8);

    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < 80*25; i++)
    {
         video_memory[i] = blank;
    }

    // Move the hardware cursor back to the start.
    cursor_x = 0;
    cursor_y = 0;
    move_cursor();
}

// Outputs a null-terminated ASCII string to the monitor.
void monitor_write(char *c)
{
    int i = 0;
    while (c[i])
    {
        monitor_put(c[i++]);
    }
}

void monitor_write_hex(u32int n)
{
    s32int tmp;

    monitor_write("0x");

    char noZeroes = 1;

    int i;
    for (i = 28; i > 0; i -= 4)
    {
        tmp = (n >> i) & 0xF;
        if (tmp == 0 && noZeroes != 0)
        {
            continue;
        }

        if (tmp >= 0xA)
        {
            noZeroes = 0;
            monitor_put (tmp-0xA+'a' );
        }
        else
        {
            noZeroes = 0;
            monitor_put( tmp+'0' );
        }
    }

    tmp = n & 0xF;
    if (tmp >= 0xA)
    {
         monitor_put (tmp-0xA+'a');
    }
    else
    {
        monitor_put (tmp+'0');
    }

}

void monitor_write_dec(u32int n)
{

    if (n == 0)
    {
        monitor_put('0');
        return;
    }

    s32int acc = n;
    char c[32];
    int i = 0;
    while (acc > 0)
    {
        c[i] = '0' + acc%10;
        acc /= 10;
        i++;
    }
    c[i] = 0;

    char c2[32];
    c2[i--] = 0;
    int j = 0;
    while(i >= 0)
    {
         c2[i--] = c[j++];
    }
    monitor_write(c2);

}

monitor.h:

// monitor.h -- Defines the interface for monitor.h
//              From JamesM's kernel development tutorials.

#ifndef MONITOR_H
#define MONITOR_H

#include "common.h"

// Write a single character out to the screen.
void monitor_put(char c);

// Clear the screen to all black.
void monitor_clear();

// Output a null-terminated ASCII string to the monitor.
void monitor_write(char *c);

#endif // MONITOR_H

common.c:

// common.c -- Defines some global functions.
//             From JamesM's kernel development tutorials.

#include "common.h"

// Write a byte out to the specified port.
void outb ( u16int port, u8int value )
{
        asm volatile ( "outb %1, %0"  : : "dN" ( port ), "a" ( value ) );
}

u8int inb ( u16int port )
{
    u8int ret;
asm volatile ( "inb %1, %0" : "=a" ( ret ) : "dN" ( port ) );
return ret;
}

u16int inw ( u16int port )
{
u16int ret;
asm volatile ( "inw %1, %0" : "=a" ( ret ) : "dN" ( port ) );
return ret;
}

// Copy len bytes from src to dest.
void memcpy(u8int *dest, const u8int *src, u32int len)
{
const u8int *sp = ( const u8int * ) src;
u8int *dp = ( u8int * ) dest;
for ( ; len != 0; len-- ) *dp++ =*sp++;
}

// Write len copies of val into dest.
void memset(u8int *dest, u8int val, u32int len)
{
u8int *temp = ( u8int * ) dest;
for ( ; len != 0; len-- ) *temp++ = val;
}

// Compare two strings. Should return -1 if 
// str1 < str2, 0 if they are equal or 1 otherwise.
int strcmp(char *str1, char *str2)
{
int i = 0;
int failed = 0;
while ( str1[i] != '\0' && str2[i] != '\0' )
{
    if ( str1[i] != str2[i] )
    {
        failed = 1;
        break;
    }
    i++;
}
// Why did the loop exit?
if ( ( str1[i] == '\0' && str2[i] != '\0' || (str1[i] != '\0' && str2[i] =='\0' ) )
    failed =1;

return failed;
}

// Copy the NULL-terminated string src into dest, and
// return dest.
char *strcpy(char *dest, const char *src)
{
do
{
    *dest++ = *src++;
}
while ( *src != 0 );
}

// Concatenate the NULL-terminated string src onto
// the end of dest, and return dest.
char *strcat(char *dest, const char *src)
{
while ( *dest != 0 )
{
    *dest = *dest++;
}

do 
{
    *dest++ = *src++;
}
while ( *src != 0 );

return dest;
}

common.h:

// common.h -- Defines typedefs and some global functions.
//             From JamesM's kernel development tutorials.

#ifndef COMMON_H
#define COMMON_H

// Some nice typedefs, to standardise sizes across platforms.
// These typedefs are written for 32-bit x86.
typedef unsigned    int     u32int;
typedef         int         s32int;
typedef unsigned    short           u16int;
typedef         short       s16int;
typedef unsigned    char        u8int;
typedef         char            s8int;

void outb ( u16int port, u8int value );
u8int inb ( u16int port );
u16int inw ( u16int port );

#endif //COMMON_H

main.c:

// main.c -- Defines the C-code kernel entry point, calls initialisation routines.
//           Made for JamesM's tutorials <www.jamesmolloy.co.uk>

#include "monitor.h"

int main(struct multiboot *mboot_ptr)
{
    monitor_clear();

monitor_write ( "hello, world!" );

return 0;
}

here is my makefile:

C_SOURCES=  main.c monitor.c common.c
S_SOURCES= boot.s
C_OBJECTS=$(patsubst %.c, obj/%.o, $(C_SOURCES))
S_OBJECTS=$(patsubst %.s, obj/%.o, $(S_SOURCES))
CFLAGS=-nostdlib -nostdinc -fno-builtin -fno-stack-protector -m32 -Iheaders
LDFLAGS=-Tlink.ld -melf_i386 --oformat=elf32-i386
ASFLAGS=-felf

all: kern/kernel

.PHONY: clean
clean:
-rm -f kern/kernel

kern/kernel: $(S_OBJECTS) $(C_OBJECTS)
ld $(LDFLAGS) -o $@ $^

$(C_OBJECTS): obj/%.o : %.c 
gcc $(CFLAGS) $< -o $@

vpath %.c source

$(S_OBJECTS): obj/%.o : %.s
    nasm $(ASFLAGS) $< -o $@

vpath %.s asem

Hopefully this will help you understand what is going wrong and how to fix it :L

Thanks in advance.

Jamie.

share|improve this question
5  
You fix it by calling your compiler in the right way. namely with all object (or source) files at once. –  Kerrek SB Apr 8 '12 at 22:27
    
can you show us how you compile it? –  MByD Apr 8 '12 at 22:33
    
Edited OP with makefile. –  Jamie Edwards Apr 8 '12 at 22:40
    
I think that worked :L I really am such a noob when it comes to make, and makefiles XD thanks for your help! –  Jamie Edwards Apr 8 '12 at 22:53
    
Why are you defining your own memset, memcpy, strcpy, strcat functions? If your implementation provides them, just use them. If not, it's better to give them different names unless you're writing your own C implementation. –  Keith Thompson Apr 8 '12 at 23:36

3 Answers 3

From your make file, it seems like you need to add the -c flag to CFLAGS:

CFLAGS=-c -nostdlib -nostdinc -fno-builtin -fno-stack-protector -m32 -Iheaders

To make each compile unit one object file. currently you try to make executable from main.c, (which of course doesn't contain all the functions).

share|improve this answer
    
I made the edits that you said I should to the makefile, and it worked, as should. Until I decided to redo everything and start fresh as it got confusing. Now it's coming out with the same although slightly different errors I have updated the OP with the new errors and the makefile Any ideas? –  Jamie Edwards Apr 16 '12 at 20:50
    
I don't see the edit. –  MByD Apr 16 '12 at 20:54
    
I noticed what the fault was as I posted the comment and I thought I the comment out, sorry. –  Jamie Edwards Apr 17 '12 at 1:14

BTW:

char *strcpy(char *dest, const char *src)
{
do
{
    *dest++ = *src++;
}
while ( *src != 0 );
}

This looks wrong. When the src pointer hits '\0', the dst pointer has not been written yet. Better use the K&R method:

char *strcpy(char *dest, const char *src)
    {
        char *org = dest;
        while (*dest++ = *src++) {;}

        return org;
    }

Next:

// Compare two strings. Should return -1 if 
// str1 < str2, 0 if they are equal or 1 otherwise.
int strcmp(char *str1, char *str2)
{
    size_t i;

    for (i=0; str1[i] || str2[i]; i++ )
    {
        if ( str1[i] != str2[i] return str1[i] - str2[i] ;
    }
    return 0;
}

Next:

// Concatenate the NULL-terminated string src onto
// the end of dest, and return dest.
char *strcat(char *dest, const char *src)
{

    char *org = dst;

    for ( ;*dest; dst++; ) {;}

    while (*dest++ = *src++) {;}

return org;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Better still, add #include <string.h> and call the standard strcpy()( function (unless you're on a freestanding implementation that doesn't support it). And unless you're writing a C implementation, calling your own function strcpy is a bad idea. BTW, this doesn't answer the question. –  Keith Thompson Apr 8 '12 at 23:07
    
Sure, but maybe the OP is on an embedded platform and does not want to draw in the library. (I hope [s]he is not ...) *continues chase for trivial errors ... * WRT the OQ: my gut feeling is that he missed a brace or a semicolon somewhere. –  wildplasser Apr 8 '12 at 23:12

First off, there are some errors in your code.

You have a missing ) on line 58 of common.c:

if ( ( str1[i] == '\0' && str2[i] != '\0' || (str1[i] != '\0' && str2[i] =='\0' ) )

And in main.c, you define main as:

int main(struct multiboot *mboot_ptr)
{
/* ... */
}

but you haven't defined struct multiboot anywhere.

Once you fix those problems, here's a simple example that illustrates the kind of "undefined symbol" problem you're running into:

func.h :

#ifndef FUNC_H

void func(void);

#endif /* FUNC_H */

func.c :

#include "func.h"

#include <stdio.h>

void func(void) {
    puts("In func");
}

main.c :

#include "func.h"

int main(void) {
    func();
    return 0;
}

func.h declares the function func (i.e., it tells the compiler how to generate a call to it).

func.c defines the function func (i.e., it tells the compiler how to generate code that actually implements the behavior). When you compile func.c, the generated code is written to func.o (at least for gcc; other compilers may do this differently).

main.c is the main program, which has a call to func.

When the compiler processes main.c, the #include "func.h" is what tells it how to generate a call to func, but that's only part of what you need. The final program has to contain not just the call to func, but the machine code that implements its behavior; that code is in func.o, generated from func.c.

So if you do this:

gcc main.c -o main

it's equivalent to these two commands:

gcc -c main.c        # generates main.o
gcc main.o -o main   # invokes the linker to generate main from main.o

This doesn't work, because you haven't told the linker where to find func.o:

main.o:main.c:(.text+0xc): undefined reference to `_func'

If you break it down into individual steps, you can do this:

gcc -c func.c        # generates func.o
gcc -c main.c        # generates main.o
gcc main.o func.o -o main   # invokes the linker to combine main.o and func.o into main

Now running ./main will print In func.

gcc will also let you combine some of these steps in various ways, for example:

gcc -c func.c
gcc main.c func.o -o main # As above, but combining the last two steps

or even:

gcc func.c main.c -o main  # Combines all three steps

If you're specifying these commands in a Makefile rather than directly, it's usually best to break them down into individual compile and link commands. This lets make re-use previously generated files; for example, if you modify func.c you won't have to recompile main.c, just re-link.

share|improve this answer
    
I have defined my multi-boot, it's in another different .s file. –  Jamie Edwards Apr 9 '12 at 21:22
    
@JamieEdwards: The definition of the type still has to be visible to the compiler when you compile your main.c. And it has to be defined in C; you can't define a struct type in a .s (assembly language) file. (Or was that a typo?) You should have struct multiboot { ... } in some .h file that you #include from main.c. –  Keith Thompson Apr 9 '12 at 21:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.