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I was wondering how I could make private variables in javascript through clojure. But still have them cloned when using Object.create.

var point = {};
(function(){
  var x, y;
  x = 0;
  y = 0;
Object.defineProperties(point, {
    "x": {
      set: function (value) {
        x = value;
      },
      get: function() {
        return x;
      }
    },
    "y": {
      set: function (value) {
        y = value;
      },
      get: function () {
        return y;
      }
    }
  });
}());

var p1 = Object.create(point);
p1.x = 100;
console.log(p1.x); // = 100
var p2 = Object.create(point);
p2.x = 200;
console.log(p2.x); //= 200
console.log(p1.x); //= 200

I got this technique from http://ejohn.org/blog/ecmascript-5-objects-and-properties/ but it got this limitation that the closure variables is the same on all Objects. I know this behaviour on javascript is supposed but how can I create true private variables?

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this code looks auto generated, was it generated by clojure code? –  Raynos Apr 8 '12 at 22:38
    
Nope it wasn't why do you think it looks auto-generated? –  automaticoo Apr 8 '12 at 22:45
2  
The easy solution is don't use privates –  Raynos Apr 8 '12 at 22:50
    
As an alternative without private variables could be jsfiddle.net/heera/G9E9m –  WereWolf - The Alpha Apr 8 '12 at 23:34
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I know this behaviour on javascript is supposed but how can I create true private variables?

You can't, there is no private in ES5. You can use ES6 private names if you want.

You can emulate ES6 private names with ES6 WeakMaps which can be shimmed in ES5. This is an expensive and ugly emulation, that's not worth the cost.

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I think, as an alternative without private variables could be jsfiddle.net/heera/G9E9m –  WereWolf - The Alpha Apr 8 '12 at 23:37
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When you need to add private variables to just one object which was created with Object.create you can make this:

var parent = { x: 0 }
var son = Object.create(parent)
son.init_private = function()
{
    var private = 0;
    this.print_and_increment_private = function()       
    {
        print(private++);
    } 
}
son.init_private()
// now we can reach parent.x, son.x, son.print_and_increment_private but not son.private

If you want you can even avoid unnecessary public function init_private like this:

(function()                                                                                                                                                                                                    
{                                                                                                                                                                                                              
    var private = 0;
    this.print_and_increment = function()
    {
        print(private++);
    }
}
).call(son)

Bad thing is that you could not append private members with several calls. The good thing is that this method is quite intuitive in my opinion.

This code was tested with Rhino 1.7 release 3 2013 01 27

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