Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to accomplish something in C# that I do easily in Java. But having some trouble. I have an undefined number of arrays of objects of type T. A implements an interface I. I need an array of I at the end that is the sum of all values from all the arrays. Assume no arrays will contain the same values.

This Java code works.

ArrayList<I> list = new ArrayList<I>();
for (Iterator<T[]> iterator = arrays.iterator(); iterator.hasNext();) {
    T[] arrayOfA = iterator.next();
    //Works like a charm
    list.addAll(Arrays.asList(arrayOfA));
}

return list.toArray(new T[list.size()]);

However this C# code doesn't:

List<I> list = new List<I>();
foreach (T[] arrayOfA in arrays)
{
    //Problem with this
    list.AddRange(new List<T>(arrayOfA));
    //Also doesn't work
    list.AddRange(new List<I>(arrayOfA));
}
return list.ToArray();

So it's obvious I need to somehow get the array of T[] into an IEnumerable<I> to add to the list but I'm not sure the best way to do this? Any suggestions?

EDIT: Developing in VS 2008 but needs to compile for .NET 2.0.

share|improve this question
    
What error are you getting? – Noel Kennedy Jun 17 '09 at 13:12
    
Invalid argument in both cases. new List<I>(arrayOfA) - fails list.AddRange(new List<T>(arrayOfA)) - fails – Adrian Hope-Bailie Jun 17 '09 at 13:20
    
(updated re comment / 2.0) – Marc Gravell Jun 17 '09 at 13:30
    
Thanks, that is what I ended up with. The answer from Dan also works well. Not sure why the direct cast AddRange((I[]) arrayOfA) won't work when Thorsten's example does work fine? – Adrian Hope-Bailie Jun 17 '09 at 14:13
    
I think you can do that in Java because of type erasure (bleh!). Behind the curtains, ArrayList<T> is actually ArrayList<?> and ArrayList<I> is also ArrayList<?>. – R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 17 '09 at 15:04
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The issue here is that C# doesn't support co-variance (at least not until C# 4.0, I think) in generics so implicit conversions of generic types won't work.

You could try this:

List<I> list = new List<I>();
foreach (T[] arrayOfA in arrays)
{
    list.AddRange(Array.ConvertAll<T, I>(arrayOfA, t => (I)t));
}
return list.ToArray();


For anyone that strumbles across this question and is using .NET 3.5, this is a slightly more compact way of doing the same thing, using Linq.

List<I> list = new List<I>();
foreach (T[] arrayOfA in arrays)
{
    list.AddRange(arrayOfA.Cast<I>());
}
return list.ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
Like that, it's very elegant. Had to give a few +1 but ended up using this. Thanks. Still confused about Throsten's answer. Not sure why it won't work in my example yet his code works fine? – Adrian Hope-Bailie Jun 17 '09 at 14:18
    
Adrian: perhaps your T is a value type? Array type covariance only works on reference types. In your example, try casting like this: (IEnum<I>)(I[])arrayOfA -- does that work? – Eric Lippert Jun 17 '09 at 15:15
    
Aha! Bingo. T is a value type, I guess I should have specified that up front. Learning lots of new stuff today. Unfortunately though your suggestion hasn't helped, still sticking with the answer above. – Adrian Hope-Bailie Jun 17 '09 at 16:35

Edited for 2.0; it can become:

static void Main() {
    IEnumerable<Foo[]> source = GetUndefinedNumberOfArraysOfObjectsOfTypeT();
    List<IFoo> list = new List<IFoo>();
    foreach (Foo[] foos in source) {
        foreach (IFoo foo in foos) {
            list.Add(foo);
        }
    }
    IFoo[] arr = list.ToArray();
}

How about (in .NET 3.5):

I[] arr = src.SelectMany(x => x).Cast<I>().ToArray();

To show this in context:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System;
interface IFoo { }
class Foo : IFoo { //  A implements an interface I
    readonly int value;
    public Foo(int value) { this.value = value; }
    public override string ToString() { return value.ToString(); }
}
static class Program {
    static void Main() {
        // I have an undefined number of arrays of objects of type T
        IEnumerable<Foo[]> source=GetUndefinedNumberOfArraysOfObjectsOfTypeT();
        // I need an array of I at the end that is the sum of
        // all values from all the arrays. 
        IFoo[] arr = source.SelectMany(x => x).Cast<IFoo>().ToArray();
        foreach (IFoo foo in arr) {
            Console.WriteLine(foo);
        }
    }
    static IEnumerable<Foo[]> GetUndefinedNumberOfArraysOfObjectsOfTypeT() {
        yield return new[] { new Foo(1), new Foo(2), new Foo(3) };
        yield return new[] { new Foo(4), new Foo(5) };
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Out of curiousity, what's the purpose of the SelectMany there? You beat me by seconds on the .Cast, so +1 from me :-) – Dan F Jun 17 '09 at 12:45
    
The SelectMany is effectively concatenating the elements of the arrays. – Jon Skeet Jun 17 '09 at 12:47
    
Awesomecake, I think I'll add that one to the list of cool things I didn't know about LINQ. Ta fellas – Dan F Jun 17 '09 at 12:53
1  
The Cast<IFoo>() is unnecessary. It would be necessary if you were assigning to IEnumerable<IFoo> instead of IFoo[] (until C# 4.0, when it becomes unnecessary there also). – Daniel Earwicker Jun 17 '09 at 13:25
1  
It is required for arrays of value-type objects ;-p – Marc Gravell Jun 17 '09 at 13:28

I assume you have tried

list.AddRange((I[])arrayOfA);

already?

EDIT In reply to your comment saying that my suggestion wouldn't work: I successfully ran this code just a minute ago:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace Tester
{
    class Program
    {
        private interface I
        {
            string GetValue();
        }

        private class A : I
        {
            private string value;

            public A(string v)
            {
                value = v;
            }

            public string GetValue()
            {
                return value;
            }
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<I> theIList = new List<I>();

            foreach (A[] a in GetAList())
            {
                theIList.AddRange((I[])a);
            }

            foreach (I i in theIList)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(i.GetValue());
            }
        }

        private static IEnumerable<A[]> GetAList()
        {
            yield return new [] { new A("1"), new A("2"), new A("3") };
            yield return new [] { new A("4") };
        }
    }
}

Or did I just muss a requirement?

share|improve this answer
1  
:) Yes that's not gonna work in any language – Adrian Hope-Bailie Jun 17 '09 at 13:09
    
I fail to see why the above should not work. I've edited my answer and posted some sample code that works. – Thorsten Dittmar Jun 17 '09 at 14:01
    
No, can't see how that works because it certainly doesn't work on my example and yet your code compiles and runs fine. As far as I understood you can never cast from T[] to I[] even if T:I. Excuse me for doubting, I must apologise! – Adrian Hope-Bailie Jun 17 '09 at 14:10
    
No need to apologize! I'm just curious why your code doesn't work while my code does. I always thought being able to cast from T[] to I[] is part of polymorphism if T implements I? Also, I'm even doing the opposite all the time, for example casting from DataRow[] to TypedDataSetRow[]. – Thorsten Dittmar Jun 17 '09 at 14:17
    
Covariant array conversions "work" in that they are legal, but they are broken in that doing so creates situations in which type safety is compromised. They are legal in C# and Java; I wish they had never been made legal in either. See my article on the subject: blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2007/10/17/… – Eric Lippert Jun 17 '09 at 15:12

Try adding a generic constraint

where T:I

share|improve this answer

I'm guessing the problem here is that generics doesn't realize that T implements I. It might work to declare explicitly T : I.

Also you could do a for loop and add your T objects one at a time instead of using AddRange.

share|improve this answer

The type structure of c# does not currently support this (treating the Foo<T> as a Foo<I> if X : I) this is termed covariance on I.

The underlying framework does, and c# 4.0 is adding support for it

As such explicit casts are required, Marc's answer being the simplest.

share|improve this answer

In your C# code you are not adding the arrayOfA to the result list:

List<I> list = new List<I>();
foreach (T[] arrayOfA in arrays)
    list.AddRange(arrayOfA);

return list.ToArray();

However, if you are using .NET 3.5 you can do this with LINQ:

return (from arrayOfA in arrays
        from element in arrayOfA
        select element as I).ToArray();

Or using LINQ methods:

return arrays.SelectMany(arrayOfA => arrayOfA.Cast<I>()).ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, well spotted. I think everyone got the gist of the question none-the-less. Fixed and a +1 for you for sharp eyes :) (Unf no LINQ so couldn't use your solution.) – Adrian Hope-Bailie Jun 17 '09 at 14:20
    
The non-LINQ code should work for you, none the less, as Rasmus says, arrays of reference objects are covariant in C#. – Bojan Resnik Jun 17 '09 at 15:08
    
I am assuming the non-LINQ code doesn't work for the same reason I cant cast form T[] to I[]. At this stage it appears this is because T is actually a value type. BAck to school for me! – Adrian Hope-Bailie Jun 17 '09 at 16:38

Arrays of reference objects are covariant in C# (the same is true for Java).

From the name, I guess that your T is a generic and not a real type, so you have to restrict it to a reference type in order to get the implicit conversion from T[] to I[].

Try this:

public static I[] MergeArrays<T,I>(IEnumerable<T[]> arrays) 
	where T:class,I
{
	List<I> list = new List<I>();
	foreach(T[] array in arrays){
		list.AddRange(array);
	}
	return list.ToArray();
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.