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Example:

class C
{
  public:
    void operator =(int i) {}
};

class SubC : public C
{
};

The following gives compilation error:

SubC subC;
subC = 0;

"no match for 'operator=' in 'subC = 0'"

Some sources state that it is because assignment operators are not inherited. But isn't it simply because default constructed copy-assignment of SubC overshadows them?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The copy assignment operator is automatically generated in the derived class. This causes the base class's assignment operator to be hidden due to the regular name hiding rules of C++. You can unhide the name in the base class through the "using" directive. For example:

class C
{
  public:
    void operator =(int i) {}
};

class SubC : public C
{
  public:
    using C::operator=;
};
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1  
Or call it directly subC.C::operator =(0); –  Jesse Good Apr 9 '12 at 0:44

A copy assignment operator for a base class does not have the signature required for a copy assignment operator for a derived class. It is inherited by the derived class, but does not constitute a copy assignment operator in it. So even though assignment operators are inherited, just like other member functions, it does not provide copy assignment.

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4  
That isn't true in general. For example, operator+ can be inherited. –  Vaughn Cato Apr 9 '12 at 0:36

I haven't done it, but according to The Man Himself (Stroustrup) it's a feature of C++11 to do it with constructors, but it's been in since C++98 to do it with other methods.

This is DIRECTLY lifted from the link:

People sometimes are confused about the fact that ordinary scope rules apply to class members. In particular, a member of a base class is not in the same scope as a member of a derived class:

struct B {
    void f(double);
};

struct D : B {
    void f(int);
};

B b;   b.f(4.5);  // fine
D d;   d.f(4.5);  // surprise: calls f(int) with argument 4

In C++98, we can "lift" a set of overloaded functions from a base class into a derived class:

struct B {
    void f(double);
};

struct D : B {
    using B::f;     // bring all f()s from B into scope
    void f(int);    // add a new f()
};

B b;   b.f(4.5);  // fine
D d;   d.f(4.5);  // fine: calls D::f(double) which is B::f(double)

So there ya go. You can probably "take it if you want it" even before C++11, though I haven't tried it myself.

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Except copy-assignment operator, other overloaded operator can be inherited.

I agree the opinion that default constructed copy-assignment of SubC overshadows overloaded assignment operator of C.

If SubC don't provide a copy-assignment operator, Compiler would synthese a copy-assignment operation, as follow:

class SubC : public C
{ 
public:
    SubC & operator=( const SubC & other );
}

then the 'SubC & operator=( const SubC & other )' overshadows assignment operator of C, results in compile error.

If

SubC other;
SubC subC;

subC = other;

then, this case, compile ok.

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