Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Okay, I spent the last couple of days researching this, and I can't believe Apache's natively supported hashing functions are that outdated.

I discovered a couple of ways to do this, which are mod_perl and mod_authnz_external, both of which are too slow, because apache runs that whenever any object inside a protected directory is called. That means that a user may have to be authenticated hundreds of times in a single session.

Has anyone ever managed to get Apache to use something that's more secure than MD5 and SHA-1 without moving authentication away from Apache? Salted SHA-2 would be a real bonus.

Thanks!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

If you're on a GNU/Linux system with a version of glibc2 released in the last 5 or so years, you can modify htpasswd's crypt() implementation to prepend "$6$" to the salt, and then it'd be as simple as:

 # htpasswd -d -c .htpasswd someusername

When the salt starts with "$6$", glibc2 will use salted SHA-512, with the up to 16 characters after that being the salt, in the range [a-zA-Z0-9./].

See man 3 crypt.

I'm not aware of any patch to support this, but it should be a simple one.

EDIT: I'd also like to mention that one round of even salted SHA-512 is breakable if your attacker is determined enough. I'd recommend, and am using in most things I've been able to edit, 128000 rounds of PBKDF2 with HMAC-SHA512, but this would be a very extensive edit, unless you want to link htpasswd against openssl, which has a PKCS5_PBKDF2_HMAC() function.

EDIT 2: Also, using openssl to do strong hashing isn't hard, if you're interested:

abraxas ~ # cat pbkdf2.c 

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <openssl/evp.h>
#include <openssl/sha.h>

#define PBKDF2_SALT_PREFIX          "$pbkdf2sha512$"
#define PBKDF2_SALT_PREFIX_LENGTH   strlen(PBKDF2_SALT_PREFIX)
#define PBKDF2_PRF_ALGORITHM        EVP_sha512()
#define PBKDF2_DIGEST_LENGTH        SHA512_DIGEST_LENGTH
#define PBKDF2_SALT_LENGTH          32
#define PBKDF2_RESULT_LENGTH        PBKDF2_SALT_PREFIX_LENGTH + (2 * PBKDF2_DIGEST_LENGTH) + PBKDF2_SALT_LENGTH + 2
#define PBKDF2_ROUNDS               128000

void hash_password(const char* pass, const unsigned char* salt, char* result)
{
    unsigned int i;
    static unsigned char digest[PBKDF2_DIGEST_LENGTH];
    memcpy(result, PBKDF2_SALT_PREFIX, PBKDF2_SALT_PREFIX_LENGTH);
    memcpy(result + PBKDF2_SALT_PREFIX_LENGTH, salt, PBKDF2_SALT_LENGTH);
    result[PBKDF2_SALT_PREFIX_LENGTH + PBKDF2_SALT_LENGTH] = '$';
    PKCS5_PBKDF2_HMAC(pass, strlen(pass), salt, PBKDF2_SALT_LENGTH, PBKDF2_ROUNDS, PBKDF2_PRF_ALGORITHM, PBKDF2_DIGEST_LENGTH, digest);
    for (i = 0; i < sizeof(digest); i++)
        sprintf(result + PBKDF2_SALT_PREFIX_LENGTH + PBKDF2_SALT_LENGTH + 1 + (i * 2), "%02x", 255 & digest[i]);
}

int main(void)
{
    char result[PBKDF2_RESULT_LENGTH];
    char pass[] = "password";
    unsigned char salt[] = "178556d2988b6f833f239cd69bc07ed3";
    printf("Computing PBKDF2(HMAC-SHA512, '%s', '%s', %d, %d) ...\n", pass, salt, PBKDF2_ROUNDS, PBKDF2_DIGEST_LENGTH);
    memset(result, 0, PBKDF2_RESULT_LENGTH);
    hash_password(pass, salt, result);
    printf("Result: %s\n", result);
    return 0;
}

abraxas ~ # gcc -Wall -Wextra -O3 -lssl pbkdf2.c -o pbkdf2
abraxas ~ # time ./pbkdf2 

Computing PBKDF2(HMAC-SHA512, 'password', '178556d2988b6f833f239cd69bc07ed3', 128000, 64) ...
Result: $pbkdf2sha512$178556d2988b6f833f239cd69bc07ed3$3acb79896ce3e623c3fac32f91d4421fe360fcdacfb96ee3460902beac26807d28aca4ed01394de2ea37b363ab86ba448286eaf21e1d5b316149c0b9886741a7

real    0m0.320s
user    0m0.319s
sys 0m0.001s

abraxas ~ # 
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.