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I am trying to write a prolog program that can find the tiles that are completely surrounded by b or w in a 2D-array.

For example, given a dataset like this:

[
    [b, w, +, +],
    [w, +, w, b],
    [+, w, b, +],
    [+, +, +, b],
]

It would return another Variable containing:

[
    [-, -, -, -],
    [-, w, -, -],
    [-, -, -, b],
    [-, -, -, -],
]

That is, it replaced all the + which were completely surrounded with b with a b, and the same for those surrounded by a w, and replaced everything else with a -.

Can anyone give any ideas on how to build a program to do this?

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Are you having a problem w/ doing this in prolog, or with the logic in general? If the former, how would you do it in another language? If the latter, what have you come up with so far? –  Scott Hunter Apr 9 '12 at 1:21
    
I am having problems with both. In another language, I would probably use one of the strongly connected components algorithms, but I am not sure how to apply it to prolog (since I can't find a way of array indexing and remembering position) –  chustar Apr 9 '12 at 1:29
1  
use nth1/3 to index elements in lists –  whd Apr 9 '12 at 10:34
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This might help: it takes the representation you gave, and gives back a list whose elements are each of the form [ColumnIndex, RowIndex, Value]. You can then use member to find an element at a particular row/column.

encodearray( A, AA ) :- ( A, 0, 0, AA ).
encodearray( [], _, _, [] ).
encodearray( [[]|A], _, R, AA ) :- R1 is R+1, encodeArray( A, 0, R1, AA ).
encodearray( [[A|B]|X], C, R, [[C,R,A]|AA] ) :- C1 is C+1, encodeArray( [B|X], C1, R, AA ).
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Thank you. I'll start working with this. –  chustar Apr 9 '12 at 2:15
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With this rep/2 predicate

rep(L0, L1) :-
    rep(b, L0, L1) ;
    rep(w, L0, L1).

rep(E, [E|Ps], [-|Rs]) :-
    rep1(E, Ps, Rs).
rep(E, [X|Ps], [-|Rs]) :-
    E \= X,
    rep(Ps, Rs).

rep1(E, [+|Ps], [E|Rs]) :-
    rep2(E, Ps, Rs).

rep2(E, [+|Ps], [E|Rs]) :-
    rep2(E, Ps, Rs).
rep2(E, [E|Ps], [-|Rs]) :-
    dash(Ps, Rs).

dash([], []).
dash([_|Ps], [-|Rs]) :- dash(Ps, Rs).

that performs this way

?- rep([b,+,b,b],L).
L = [-, b, -, -] ;
false.

?- rep([b,+,+,+,+,+,b,+,b],L).
L = [-, b, b, b, b, b, -, -, -] .

?- rep([w,+,+,+,+,+,w,+,b],L).
L = [-, w, w, w, w, w, -, -, -] .

?- rep([b,+,+,+,+,+,w,+,b],L).
false.

?- rep([b,+,+,+,+,+,+,b],L).
L = [-, b, b, b, b, b, b, -] .

?- rep([b,+,+,+,+,+,+,+,b],L).
L = [-, b, b, b, b, b, b, b, -] .

?- rep([b,+,+,w,+,+,w,+,b],L).
L = [-, -, -, -, w, w, -, -, -] .

and a transposition predicate to enable rep/2 to work on columns

transpose_col_row([], []).
transpose_col_row([U], B) :- gen(U, B).
transpose_col_row([H|T], R) :- transpose_col_row(T, TC), splash(H, TC, R).

gen([H|T], [[H]|RT]) :- gen(T,RT).
gen([], []).

splash([], [], []).
splash([H|T], [R|K], [[H|R]|U]) :-
    splash(T,K,U).

you could combine them to solve your problem. HTH

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