Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I saw an answer in another question saying that this should work:

using System.IO;
if (File.Exists(Path))
{
    Action();
}

However, when I do this, I get these errors:

'System.IO' is a 'namespace', which is not valid in the given context

The Name 'File' does not exist in the current context

What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
You also may want to take a look at ReSharper, a tool (not free) that helps to write cleaner code and shows that type of exceptions right when you type the code. –  Mathieu Apr 9 '12 at 2:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Either Add using System.IO; at top of your file

Or

use it like

if (System.IO.File.Exists(Path))
{
  //do whatever
}
share|improve this answer

You need to put using System.IO; at the top of your file outside the class.

share|improve this answer
    
can i ask why this is not the accepted answer ? robbie answered before @Shyju but yet you accepted his answer ? –  krystan honour Apr 12 '12 at 19:27
    
maybe its because @Shyju provided the extra alternative of not having a using? I'm not really bothered, but thanks for having my corner :) –  Robbie Apr 12 '12 at 19:48

It's hard to tell what you're doing exactly, but it looks like you might need some help with the order of your statements. using statements appear at the beginning of the .cs file, and your logic will need to appear in a method within a class.

Here's how it can be done using a console application:

using System.IO;

public class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string path = @"c:\temp\file.txt";

        if (File.Exists(path))
        {
            Action();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

At the very top of your file:

using System.IO; <--

namespace Application1
{
share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't necessarily need to be outside of namespace declarations, but it must be outside the class declaration –  Davy8 Apr 9 '12 at 1:37
    
@Davy8 Ooh, I didn't knew this, thanks! –  Sapphire Fox Apr 10 '12 at 8:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.