Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Although, I could commit my change locally, I can not push to origin master

I run

$ git remote add origin git@github.com:username/test.git

I get

fatal: remote origin already exists.

I run

$ git push -u origin master

I get

ERROR: Repository not found.
fatal: The remote end hung up unexpectedly

What's wrong with this?

share|improve this question
1  
You can see the values for your currently defined remotes with git remote -v. –  Amber Apr 9 '12 at 2:09

3 Answers 3

2-way to do this
1st:-

 git remote set-url <name> <newurl>

example:-

git remote set-url origin git@github.com:username/test.git

2nd:-

What you need to do is change your 'origin' setting.you edit .git/config in your project root, which may look something like this:

...
[remote "origin"]
url = git://user@dev.foo.com/git/repos/path
fetch = +refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/origin/*
...

or if your 'remote' is actually local:

...
[remote "origin"]
url = /path/to/repos/on/this/machine
fetch = +refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/origin/*
...

All you need to do is edit that file with your favorite editor and change the url = setting to your new location. Assuming the new repository is correctly set up and you have your URL right, you'll be happily pushing and pulling to and from your new remote location.

share|improve this answer

It looks like there's a bad entry for origin in your config file.

Edit your repository's .git/config file to change it; the format is fairly self-explanatory, but post its contents if you have trouble.

share|improve this answer
    
That was weird. I did the same thing from the begging, and then it worked this time.. Thanks anyway! –  Koh Takahashi Apr 9 '12 at 3:46

Use this commands. Suppose test.md is the new file you created and you want to push it with the message "Testing"

$ git add test.md
$ git commit -a -m "Testing"
$ git push origin master

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Git commit with the -a flag will commit all changed files, not only the one you added with add. This is a pretty bad advice here. –  kaiser Oct 21 at 11:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.