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OK, I confess at the outset I'm over my head a bit here.

I've had some code working fine. I created a global array variable z1=[]; and then stored ZeroClipboard objects in the array using the unique reference key r with the following code. (This may be evil in itself, but it worked.)

function zc(r){
    var a="RP"+r,b="RDC"+r,c="RP"+r;
    z1[r]=new ZeroClipboard.Client();
    z1[r].addEventListener('mouseDown',function(client){z1[r].setText(document.getElementById(c).innerHTML);});
    z1[r].addEventListener('complete',function(client,text){$('#'+a).aH("#D6EBFF",1000);});
    z1[r].glue(a,b);}

I've recently realised how desperately wicked it is to have z1 as a global variable, so I'm trying to mend my ways and create an object to bound the whole business. But it's not working...

I've done the following:

var zc={
    z1: [],

    add:function(r){
        var a="RP"+r,b="RDC"+r,c="RP"+r;
        z1[r]=new ZeroClipboard.Client();
        z1[r].addEventListener('mouseDown',function(client){z1[r].setText(document.getElementById(c).innerHTML);});
        z1[r].addEventListener('complete',function(client,text){$('#'+a).aH("#D6EBFF",1000);});
        z1[r].glue(a,b);}
}

And I'm now calling zc.add(r) instead of zc(r) like before.

The Firebug error I'm getting is z1 is not defined. Why can my 'add' method not see my 'z1' property?

[Oh, and before someone asks why I don't just put z1 in zc as it is, it's because I access z1 from elsewhere in the code, and so I'm going to add further methods to the object.)

share|improve this question
    
Thanks, all :) After all that, even when it works in itself it doesn't do what I want it to because the ZeroClipboard client EventListeners don't find the z1 array to copy the text to the clipboard. C'est la vie :) – Nick Apr 9 '12 at 2:52
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Change z1[r] to this.z1[r]

I might also suggest setting it to a variable in the scope to avoid the lookups.

var zr = this.z1[r] = new ZeroClipboard.Client();
zr.addEventListener()
share|improve this answer
  1. Replace z1 occurences to this.r1
  2. Perhaps I misunderstand your effort, but zc is also a global variable (it seems)
share|improve this answer

zc is an object literal in your second code block, so I don't think the anonymous function knows about that object's members (ie they're not in the same closure). You should instead create a new function:

var ZC = function () {
    var z1  = [];
    this.add = function(r){
        var a="RP"+r,b="RDC"+r,c="RP"+r;
        z1[r]=new ZeroClipboard.Client();
        z1[r].addEventListener('mouseDown',function(client){z1[r].setText(document.getElementById(c).innerHTML);});
        z1[r].addEventListener('complete',function(client,text){$('#'+a).aH("#D6EBFF",1000);});
        z1[r].glue(a,b);
    };
};
var _zc = new ZC();
_zc.add();

This has the advantage of also keeping z1 private (inaccessible outside of the function's scope).

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, that is incorrect. – ZenMaster Apr 9 '12 at 2:35
    
What is incorrect, let me know so I can fix it. – Abdullah Jibaly Apr 9 '12 at 2:36
    
"so I don't think the anonymous function knows about that object's members" - this. Or may be you didn't word it properly. add function that belongs to zc object (that defined as object literal) most certainly does know about zc properties. The fact that add property is assigned an anonymous function doesn't change that. – ZenMaster Apr 9 '12 at 2:37
    
Yeah, I tried to clear that in the parens (that they don't share the same closure). It can still access the members through the context (this), but that's the only way, right? – Abdullah Jibaly Apr 9 '12 at 2:39
    
I am not sure I understand what you mean by "that's the only way". As any function it will also have access to, simplifying it a bit, all the variables on the scope of its definition. – ZenMaster Apr 9 '12 at 2:42

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