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#!/bin/sh
INTERVAL=1
COUNT=0
while [ $COUNT -le 9 ]
do
    (( COUNT++ ))
    sleep $INTERVAL
    echo "count is $COUNT"
done

On execution.

$ sh ascript 
ascript: 9: COUNT++: not found
count is 0
ascript: 9: COUNT++: not found
count is 0
ascript: 9: COUNT++: not found
count is 0
ascript: 9: COUNT++: not found
count is 0
ascript: 9: COUNT++: not found
count is 0
ascript: 9: COUNT++: not found
count is 0
ascript: 9: COUNT++: not found
count is 0
ascript: 9: COUNT++: not found
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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You probably want #!/bin/bash rather than #!/bin/sh at the top if you want to use bash-specific operations.

Your script does work fine here on my Mac, where sh is really just bash. If your sh is a real one you might not be so lucky.

share|improve this answer
    
Arithmetic substitution is POSIX, not just bash. –  geekosaur Apr 9 '12 at 2:56
    
So maybe OP's sh isn't fully POSIX then - what's the difference? –  Carl Norum Apr 9 '12 at 2:57
    
@geekosaur I don't think the naked (( )) construct is POSIX, though $(( )) is. For example, dash chokes on OP's script in exactly the same way. –  Clueless Apr 9 '12 at 3:00
    
The naked (()) is definitely listed in the bash man page. –  Carl Norum Apr 9 '12 at 3:00
    
On my machine, bash ascript and sh ascript work just fine but dash ascript fails as OP describes. –  Clueless Apr 9 '12 at 3:02

(( )) would be a nested subshell (two of them, in fact) with an invocation of a command COUNT++. You want the $(( )) arithmetic substitution mechanism; but that will actually substitute, so you either want to hide it in a comment or use an increment that involves a substitution.

: $(( COUNT++ )) # : is a shell comment

or

COUNT=$(( $COUNT + 1 ))
share|improve this answer
    
OP's script works fine for me here with bash, no $ required. –  Carl Norum Apr 9 '12 at 2:59
    
@CarlNorum you're right. Thanks geekosaur for telling me about this. –  yayu Apr 9 '12 at 3:00
    
: does not begin a comment; it is a no-op, in this case taking a single argument. Comments are indicated by #. (But +1 anyway) –  William Pursell Apr 9 '12 at 4:07
    
: was a shell comment back before # comments were borrowed from csh. –  geekosaur Apr 9 '12 at 4:09

From help for:

for ((: for (( exp1; exp2; exp3 )); do COMMANDS; done
    Arithmetic for loop.

    Equivalent to
        (( EXP1 ))
        while (( EXP2 )); do
                COMMANDS
                (( EXP3 ))
        done
    EXP1, EXP2, and EXP3 are arithmetic expressions.  If any expression is
    omitted, it behaves as if it evaluates to 1.


    Exit Status:
    Returns the status of the last command executed.

Don't forget to execute it using bash.

share|improve this answer

This: (( COUNT++ )) doesn't do what you want.

Change to: let "COUNT++"

See: http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/ops.html for more on arithmetic operations in bash.

And, to use bash, use #!/bin/bash rather than #!/bin/sh

share|improve this answer
    
This works. (had to switch from sh to bash, as let was not defined in sh) –  yayu Apr 9 '12 at 2:59
    
let and (( )) are literally identical in bash. The man page even says so: "(( ))... This is exactly equivalent to let 'expression'." –  Carl Norum Apr 9 '12 at 3:05
1  
@yayu It was switching to Bash, not switching to let, that fixed your problem; let is the same as (( )) in Bash, but neither of those are defined in POSIX. If you are on a Debian based system (Debian, Ubuntu, Mint, or one of the many other varieties), sh is probably Dash, which is a minimalist shell that doesn't support much beyond what POSIX requires. –  Brian Campbell Apr 9 '12 at 3:05
#!/bin/bash
COUNT=0;
while [ $COUNT -le 9 ] ; 
do sleep 1; 
(( COUNT++ )) ; 
echo $COUNT ; 
done

It's a better way to write this script. And I recommend you to run your script as follow:
./script.sh
or
bash ./script.sh

If you don't have bash, use this way:

#!/bin/sh
ENV=1
while [ $ENV -le 10 ]
do
sleep 1
echo $ENV
ENV=`expr $ENV + 1`
done
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