Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm not a bash scriptor, so this is no doubt a very simple question.

I have a bash script throwing an error. It looks like this:

#!/bin/bash
for i in (cat /root/list.txt)
do
        doSomething
done

The error is on the second line, related to the curly brackets. So it seems curly brackets shouldn't be here... in which case, what should line 2 look like?

The script is supposed to read each line out of /root/list.txt and then doSomething with this (I removed the actual command for this example.)

Thanks!

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Probably

for i in $(cat /root/list.txt)
share|improve this answer
    
Probably, or certainly? Because if I run this script incorrectly it could mess up a lot of work. –  Alasdair Apr 9 '12 at 4:30
2  
In that case you should definitely test it by doing something benign in the loop body (such as echoing i). –  Drooling_Sheep Apr 9 '12 at 4:32
    
As above; it's hard for me to guess details although that's the most likely intended code, but any time something could have drastic effects it's a very good idea to run it initially stubbed (with leading echos etc.) and verify its behavior. For a fixed script you may want to implement a --dry-run option to do this. Also note the other answer; one of the uncertainties is that for will word-split, not line-split, and I have no way of knowing which is correct in your application. –  geekosaur Apr 9 '12 at 4:35
    
Word split would be fine. Here is the actual command then: sshpass -p 'PasswordRemoved' scp *-install.sh -l root -o UserKnownHostsFile=/dev/null -o StrictHostKeyCheck ${i}: the list.txt is a list of IP addresses to copy the files to. –  Alasdair Apr 9 '12 at 4:38
    
So will the $ sign fix that? –  Alasdair Apr 9 '12 at 4:39
show 2 more comments

You should not use a for loop to read lines. Use a while read loop instead.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the only correct answer. –  jordanm Apr 9 '12 at 13:42
add comment

You can debug your bash script with :

set -x

Use this :

for line in $(cat /etc/fstab)
do 
   echo $line ; sleep 1
done

Or this :

while read line
do
    echo $line ; sleep 1
done < /etc/fstab

Note : line is variable

share|improve this answer
add comment

try

#!/bin/bash
for i in `cat /root/list.txt`
do
    doSomething
done
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.