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If your just want to compile and run some code then go back without any changes what's standard practise? (EDIT: assume the parent is at tip to begin with)

hg revert -C -r 0 --all

hg revert -C -r tip --all

OR

hg update -C -r 0

hg update -C -r tip

I'm ok with deleting uncommitted stuff (-C) but is there any prefered way. Also annoyingly tortoisehg doesn't seem to do the revert workflow with a click any ideas? http://comments.gmane.org/gmane.comp.version-control.mercurial.tortoisehg.user/2728

P.S I know update move's the parent and revert does not.

share|improve this question
    
What do you want to do ? I really don't understand what "If your just want to compile and run some code". If you simply want to discard local changes, hg up -C will do the trick nicely. – krtek Apr 9 '12 at 10:49
    
I'm saying I just want to see what the program did back then by running it. I do not want to commit anything until I first change back to tip(as shown), discarding what I ran. – sabgenton Apr 10 '12 at 6:17
    
I should also add if you know a third command that does it better please share! – sabgenton Apr 10 '12 at 6:47
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Update is the better choice. That way if you forget and make a code tweak you're in a position to commit it, possibly creating a new head, which is okay.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm fair call. If your absolutely bent on not creating a new head in your project (all linear) is there any other downsides? – sabgenton Apr 10 '12 at 6:15
    
A VCS history that looks like it was braided is the mark of a DVCS tool well used. Linear histories were the sad result of inadequate pre-DVCS tools. Merging in a DVCS should be a daily occurrence, not the to-be-avoided nightmare it was in CVS/svn. That said you cal always use hg rebase later if you value aesthetics over accuracy. – Ry4an Apr 10 '12 at 14:59
    
Ok Mercurial backs this up here: mercurial.selenic.com/wiki/… – sabgenton Apr 13 '12 at 6:36

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