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I wrote the following script, which generates a SyntaxError:

#!/usr/bin/python
print "Enter the filename: "
filename = raw_input("> ")
print "Here is your file %r: ", % filename

txt = open(filename)
print txt.read()
txt.close()

Here is the error:

  File "ex02.py", line 4
    print "Here is your file %r: ", % filename
                                    ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

How should I fix this?

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thanks everyone. it was a stupid mistake. Just starting out with python :) –  John Apr 9 '12 at 5:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The trouble lies here:

print "Here is your file %r: ", % filename
                              ^

When print finds a comma, it uses that as an argument separator, as can be seen with:

>>> print 1,2
1 2

In that case, the next argument needs to be valid and the sequence % filename is not.

What you undoubtedly meant was:

print "Here is your file %r: " % filename

as per the following transcript:

>>> filename = "whatever"

>>> print "file is %r", % filename
  File "<stdin>", line 1
    print "file is %r", % filename
                        ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

>>> print "file is %r" % filename
file is 'whatever'
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3  
A comma at the end of a print statement changes the terminator from a newline to a space. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 9 '12 at 5:43
    
Of course, this changes in 3.x, where print becomes an actual function. –  Karl Knechtel Apr 9 '12 at 10:15

You can't have a comma there.

print ("Here is your file %r: " % filename),
share|improve this answer
    
What's the ending comma for? –  Abhranil Das Apr 9 '12 at 5:44
3  
@Abhranil: A comma at the end of a print statement changes the terminator from a newline to a space. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 9 '12 at 5:44
    
Oh good, I didn't know that! And what if I don't want even a space, do you know how to do that? –  Abhranil Das Apr 9 '12 at 5:46
2  
@Abhranil: You'd write directly to sys.stdout. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 9 '12 at 5:48
1  
sys.stdout.write() –  kindall Apr 9 '12 at 5:49

The coma is not needed, try:

filename = raw_input("> ")
print "Here is your file %r: " % filename
share|improve this answer
1  
Actually, the comma probably is needed. It just can't go there. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 9 '12 at 5:45

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