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I have read through some tutorials about javascript prototypal inheritance patterns but I am not sure which is the best practice out of the following two. I noted that many people do this inheritance pattern:

var A = function (){}
A.prototype = {} 

var B = function () {
    A.apply(this, arguments); // Calling the constructor of A
}
B.prototype = new A(); // Inherit from A through an instance

Alternative, there are some sources that do the following pattern instead:

var A = function (){}
A.prototype = {} 

var B = function () {
    A.apply(this, arguments); // Calling the constructor of A
}
for (var prop in A.prototype) {
    B.prototype[prop] = A.prototype[prop]; // Inherit from A by copying every property/methods from A
}

Although both patterns work, I rarely see people use the latter inheritance pattern (ie. copying each property/methods from the parent's prototype) - why? Is there something wrong with copying properties/methods directly from parent to child? Also, are these two patterns intrinsically different in some ways?

Thank you.

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The most modern pattern is B.prototype = Object.create(A.prototype). This avoids instantiating a new A object, and thus inheriting instance-only properties. –  Domenic Apr 9 '12 at 7:14
    
Thanks. This looks like a very clean approach to prototypal inheritance. –  tonytz Apr 10 '12 at 9:15
    
I also like the Object.create() method best. I have details on my blog: ncombo.wordpress.com/2013/07/11/… –  Jon Jul 11 '13 at 13:50
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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

These patterns are very different, and as you may have guessed, the first is better (but not the best possible). Let us compare:

The Most Modern, Best Pattern

B.prototype = Object.create(A.prototype);

This uses the Object.create function to set B.prototype to a new object, whose internal [[Prototype]] is A.prototype. This is basically exactly what you want: it will make B instances delegate to A.prototype when appropriate.

The Original Pattern

B.prototype = new A();

This was how things used to be done, before ES5's Object.create came about. (Although there were workarounds, even if they were not widely used.) The problem with this approach is that any instance-only data properties also end up on B.prototype, which is not desired. Additionally, any side effects of calling A's constructor will happen. Essentially this approach muddles two related, but different concepts: object instantiation, and object construction.

The Non-Standard Pattern from Your Post

for (var prop in A.prototype) {
    B.prototype[prop] = A.prototype[prop];
}

This pattern has several problems:

  • It will copy properties from everywhere in A's prototype chain, all the way down to Object, directly into B.prototype. This defeats much of the purpose of prototypal inheritance, wherein you should be delegating up the prototype chain, instead of squashing it into one single level.
  • It only gets enumerable properties from A.prototype and its prototype chain, since for ... in skips non-enumerable properties.
  • It messes up any getters or setters defined on A.prototype (or its prototype chain), simply copying over their value instead of the getter/setter functions.
  • It will look effin' weird to anyone trying to read your code.
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The statement [for..in] only gets enumerable properties from the prototype chain in incorrect. for..in visits all enumerable properties of an object, including those directly on the object, not just those on its [[Prototype]] chain. –  RobG Apr 9 '12 at 9:05
    
@RobG Thanks; I can see how my working was unclear. I'll rephrase to make it more obvious what I meant. –  Domenic Apr 9 '12 at 12:59
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The first variant looks like a common prototypal inheritance. It has a small minus, that if function A takes some required arguments, you should pass them when setting a prototype for function B. It also creates an instance of a parent object for a prototype. If you don't need such a behavior the second variant looks useful.

By the way: Take a look at The third variant to make prototypal inheritance. This is also very useful sometimes.

EDIT: As far as I understood, the third variant is an old-fashioned variant of Domenic's solution (for old browsers that have no Object.create function).

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Here is another method using the factory pattern, no prototypes:

/* parent */
function Animal(name, legs)
{
    /* members and methods declared within a new object */
    var obj =
    {
        name: name,
        legs: legs,
        description: function ()
        {
            return this.name + " is an animal";
        },
        printNumLegs: function ()
        {
            return this.name + " has " + this.legs + " legs";
        }
    }

    return obj;
}

/* subclass */
function Cat()
{
    /* apply parent arguments in the context of the current object */
    var obj = Animal.apply(this, arguments);

    /* public member */
    obj.furColor = "black";
    /* private member */
    var sleeping = false;
    /* private method */
    function printSleepingState()
    {
        /* can access public member ('name') without it being passed as constructor argument */
        return obj.name + " is " + (sleeping ? "sleeping" : "not sleeping");
    }

    /* declare a new method */
    obj.printFurColor = function ()
    {
        return obj.name + " has " + obj.furColor + " fur";
    }

    /* overloading */

    /* save parent method if needed */
    var oldDescription = obj.description;

    obj.description = function ()
    {
        return oldDescription.apply(obj) + " and " + printSleepingState();
    }

    return obj;
}

/* create object without new */
var kitty = Cat("Kitty", 4);
kitty.furColor = "yellow";

There is no "best" method anyway...it's all a matter of taste.

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3  
+1 for using a function declarations instead of expressions. I have no idea why some find them scary, perhaps they just aren't hip. –  RobG Apr 9 '12 at 9:09
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I realize this answer is late, but I thought I would add comments for future readers.

I would like to add that there are other options than the those described above.

An alternative to inheritance is mix-ins. Visit http://javascriptweblog.wordpress.com/2011/05/31/a-fresh-look-at-javascript-mixins/

There are some similarities between mix-ins, and approach #2, but they are different. In many situations, Mixins can be much more flexible than the inheritance techniques described above because they allow one object to be mixed (take on behaviour) from several mix-ins. Although mix-ins add behaviour, they typically do not add state to your object.

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