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Operator overloading

What is the differences between the following ways to overload operator== ?

// stroustrup way
friend bool operator== (MyClass &lhs, MyClass &rhs); 

and

// as taught in other places, including caltech
bool MyClass::operator== (MyClass &rhs);

Which way is better?

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marked as duplicate by R. Martinho Fernandes, Mat, Alok Save, BЈовић, Nawaz Apr 9 '12 at 7:34

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
You can find the answer to this question and many more in the operator overloading FAQ :) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 9 '12 at 7:05
    
The FAQ says "The binary infix comparison operators should, according to the rules of thumb, be implemented as non-member functions" but it doesn't justify why this rule exists - stackoverflow.com/questions/4421706/operator-overloading/… –  danio Feb 5 '14 at 11:10

3 Answers 3

// stroustrup way
friend bool operator== (MyClass &lhs, MyClass &rhs);

Arguments should be const - friend bool operator==(const MyClass& lhs, const MyClass& rhs);. This is prefered as it works when the first argument can be implicitly constructed. For example, if std::string only had a member function operator==, then "abc" == my_std_string would not invoke it! But, the non-member function can be invoked by implicitly constructing a string from "abc" (better yet in this particular case, a separate bool operator==(const char*, const std::string&) can be provided for performance reasons, but the point still stands - non-member functions can help ensure the operator works with the user-defined-type on either side).

Separately, implicit constructors are a bit dangerous - and you want to think hard about the convenience versus danger of using them.

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First is external friend function (free function)

friend bool operator== (MyClass &lhs, MyClass &rhs); 

Second is member function

bool MyClass::operator== (MyClass &rhs);

You should use second variant always then you can

You should use first variant in case: 1) First argument is the external (library) class

friend ostream& operator<< (ostream &out, MyClass &m)

2) Operator's logic not related to your class and must be implemented separately

friend bool operator(const MyClass& my, const std::string& string_form)

(because your class can't know all about classes that may need in compare operator)

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-1: sorry, but the first variant should generally be preferred as explained in my answer. –  Tony D Apr 9 '12 at 7:28

This :

friend bool operator== (MyClass &lhs, MyClass &rhs); 

is a function, which compares two objects.

This :

bool MyClass::operator== (MyClass &rhs);

is a member function.

You should use the one proposed by your coding standard, or use the one you prefer. None is better. Some people (including myself) prefer to have the comparison operator as a function, other prefer it as a member function.

By the way, the parameters should be of const MyClass & type.

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