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In my app,I construct a calendar widget for my actvity, when I scroll it to previous or next month,I let it make a toast and show it.

The question is, the toast need time to show, when I scroll it fast enough, for example, I scrolled to "2012/05" and "2012/06"and scroll to "2012/07" without pause, I have to wait the Toast of "2012/05", "2012/06","2012/07" to show one by one slowly.

Seems like android has a invisible queue to manage toasts

how can I clean it and only show the last toast?Can I show a specificate Toast immediately without waiting?

I searched the "android.widget.Toast.java" and find a method "cancel()",but unfortunately it dose not work as follow.

if (t != null) {
    t.cancel();
}
t = Toast.makeText(this.mContext, mHelper.getYear() + "年"
                + (mHelper.getMonth() + 1) + "月", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT);
t.show();
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1  
I've been trying to figure it out but honestly I have no idea why it doesn't work. your code should work if cancel() did what it says it does. maybe you'll have to use something else instead of toasts. –  Joe Apr 9 '12 at 8:31
    
@topxebec your code should work. It forms the basis of my Boast class reference in answer below stackoverflow.com/a/16103514/383414 –  Richard Le Mesurier Apr 19 '13 at 11:27

5 Answers 5

up vote -1 down vote accepted

You can't do that, for that you have to create your own custom View which looks like Toast.

.hide()
.cancel()

above methods are available but they dont seems to be work.

share|improve this answer
    
maybe you are right,thanks. –  topxebec Apr 9 '12 at 8:44
1  
you are incorrect - you just need to call cancel() on the right object. see answer stackoverflow.com/a/16103514/383414 –  Richard Le Mesurier Apr 19 '13 at 11:25

Here is my answer copied from another similar question here:

The Boast class accomplishes exactly what you need.


The trick is to keep track of the last Toast that was shown, and to cancel that one.

What I have done is to create a Toast wrapper, that contains a static reference to the last Toast displayed.

When I need to show a new one, I first cancel the static reference, before showing the new one (and saving it in the static).

Here's full code of the Boast wrapper I made - it mimics enough of the Toast methods for me to use it. By default the Boast will cancel the previous one, so you don't build up a queue of Toasts waiting to be displayed.

If you just want to know how to cancel the notifications when exiting your app, you will find lots of help in there.


package com.mobiRic.ui.widget;

import android.annotation.SuppressLint;
import android.content.Context;
import android.content.res.Resources;
import android.widget.Toast;

/**
 * {@link Toast} decorator allowing for easy cancellation of notifications. Use
 * this class if you want subsequent Toast notifications to overwrite current
 * ones. </p>
 * 
 * By default, a current {@link Boast} notification will be cancelled by a
 * subsequent notification. This default behaviour can be changed by calling
 * certain methods like {@link #show(boolean)}.
 */
public class Boast
{
    /**
     * Keeps track of certain {@link Boast} notifications that may need to be cancelled.
     * This functionality is only offered by some of the methods in this class.
     */
    private volatile static Boast globalBoast = null;

    // ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

    /**
     * Internal reference to the {@link Toast} object that will be displayed.
     */
    private Toast internalToast;

    // ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

    /**
     * Private constructor creates a new {@link Boast} from a given
     * {@link Toast}.
     * 
     * @throws NullPointerException
     *         if the parameter is <code>null</code>.
     */
    private Boast(Toast toast)
    {
        // null check
        if (toast == null)
        {
            throw new NullPointerException(
                "Boast.Boast(Toast) requires a non-null parameter.");
        }

        internalToast = toast;
    }

    // ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

    /**
     * Make a standard {@link Boast} that just contains a text view.
     * 
     * @param context
     *        The context to use. Usually your {@link android.app.Application}
     *        or {@link android.app.Activity} object.
     * @param text
     *        The text to show. Can be formatted text.
     * @param duration
     *        How long to display the message. Either {@link #LENGTH_SHORT} or
     *        {@link #LENGTH_LONG}
     */
    @SuppressLint("ShowToast")
    public static Boast makeText(Context context, CharSequence text,
        int duration)
    {
        return new Boast(Toast.makeText(context, text, duration));
    }

    /**
     * Make a standard {@link Boast} that just contains a text view with the
     * text from a resource.
     * 
     * @param context
     *        The context to use. Usually your {@link android.app.Application}
     *        or {@link android.app.Activity} object.
     * @param resId
     *        The resource id of the string resource to use. Can be formatted
     *        text.
     * @param duration
     *        How long to display the message. Either {@link #LENGTH_SHORT} or
     *        {@link #LENGTH_LONG}
     * 
     * @throws Resources.NotFoundException
     *         if the resource can't be found.
     */
    @SuppressLint("ShowToast")
    public static Boast makeText(Context context, int resId, int duration)
        throws Resources.NotFoundException
    {
        return new Boast(Toast.makeText(context, resId, duration));
    }

    /**
     * Make a standard {@link Boast} that just contains a text view. Duration
     * defaults to {@link #LENGTH_SHORT}.
     * 
     * @param context
     *        The context to use. Usually your {@link android.app.Application}
     *        or {@link android.app.Activity} object.
     * @param text
     *        The text to show. Can be formatted text.
     */
    @SuppressLint("ShowToast")
    public static Boast makeText(Context context, CharSequence text)
    {
        return new Boast(Toast.makeText(context, text, Toast.LENGTH_SHORT));
    }

    /**
     * Make a standard {@link Boast} that just contains a text view with the
     * text from a resource. Duration defaults to {@link #LENGTH_SHORT}.
     * 
     * @param context
     *        The context to use. Usually your {@link android.app.Application}
     *        or {@link android.app.Activity} object.
     * @param resId
     *        The resource id of the string resource to use. Can be formatted
     *        text.
     * 
     * @throws Resources.NotFoundException
     *         if the resource can't be found.
     */
    @SuppressLint("ShowToast")
    public static Boast makeText(Context context, int resId)
        throws Resources.NotFoundException
    {
        return new Boast(Toast.makeText(context, resId, Toast.LENGTH_SHORT));
    }

    // ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

    /**
     * Show a standard {@link Boast} that just contains a text view.
     * 
     * @param context
     *        The context to use. Usually your {@link android.app.Application}
     *        or {@link android.app.Activity} object.
     * @param text
     *        The text to show. Can be formatted text.
     * @param duration
     *        How long to display the message. Either {@link #LENGTH_SHORT} or
     *        {@link #LENGTH_LONG}
     */
    public static void showText(Context context, CharSequence text, int duration)
    {
        Boast.makeText(context, text, duration).show();
    }

    /**
     * Show a standard {@link Boast} that just contains a text view with the
     * text from a resource.
     * 
     * @param context
     *        The context to use. Usually your {@link android.app.Application}
     *        or {@link android.app.Activity} object.
     * @param resId
     *        The resource id of the string resource to use. Can be formatted
     *        text.
     * @param duration
     *        How long to display the message. Either {@link #LENGTH_SHORT} or
     *        {@link #LENGTH_LONG}
     * 
     * @throws Resources.NotFoundException
     *         if the resource can't be found.
     */
    public static void showText(Context context, int resId, int duration)
        throws Resources.NotFoundException
    {
        Boast.makeText(context, resId, duration).show();
    }

    /**
     * Show a standard {@link Boast} that just contains a text view. Duration
     * defaults to {@link #LENGTH_SHORT}.
     * 
     * @param context
     *        The context to use. Usually your {@link android.app.Application}
     *        or {@link android.app.Activity} object.
     * @param text
     *        The text to show. Can be formatted text.
     */
    public static void showText(Context context, CharSequence text)
    {
        Boast.makeText(context, text, Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
    }

    /**
     * Show a standard {@link Boast} that just contains a text view with the
     * text from a resource. Duration defaults to {@link #LENGTH_SHORT}.
     * 
     * @param context
     *        The context to use. Usually your {@link android.app.Application}
     *        or {@link android.app.Activity} object.
     * @param resId
     *        The resource id of the string resource to use. Can be formatted
     *        text.
     * 
     * @throws Resources.NotFoundException
     *         if the resource can't be found.
     */
    public static void showText(Context context, int resId)
        throws Resources.NotFoundException
    {
        Boast.makeText(context, resId, Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
    }

    // ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

    /**
     * Close the view if it's showing, or don't show it if it isn't showing yet.
     * You do not normally have to call this. Normally view will disappear on
     * its own after the appropriate duration.
     */
    public void cancel()
    {
        internalToast.cancel();
    }

    /**
     * Show the view for the specified duration. By default, this method cancels
     * any current notification to immediately display the new one. For
     * conventional {@link Toast#show()} queueing behaviour, use method
     * {@link #show(boolean)}.
     * 
     * @see #show(boolean)
     */
    public void show()
    {
        show(true);
    }

    /**
     * Show the view for the specified duration. This method can be used to
     * cancel the current notification, or to queue up notifications.
     * 
     * @param cancelCurrent
     *        <code>true</code> to cancel any current notification and replace
     *        it with this new one
     * 
     * @see #show()
     */
    public void show(boolean cancelCurrent)
    {
        // cancel current
        if (cancelCurrent && (globalBoast != null))
        {
            globalBoast.cancel();
        }

        // save an instance of this current notification
        globalBoast = this;

        internalToast.show();
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, nice clean solution :-) –  The Nail Jun 12 '13 at 20:47
1  
does not seem to work in gingerbread BTW, there the old toast stays visible and new toast comes after it –  The Nail Jun 12 '13 at 20:56
    
@thenail Thx for feedback. Which device if you will? Was working on our Samsung 2.3 device but can't remember what model. And worked on HTC Desire 2.2, Galaxy Nexus 4.1. Feedback appreciated. –  Richard Le Mesurier Jun 12 '13 at 21:57
1  
+1 for calling it Boast ;) –  Magicode Jun 13 '14 at 18:32
    
Awersome! Just a fix that works for me, I changed the private constructor to public and then I used your class like: mBoast = new Boast(new Toast(this)); mBoast.makeText(...); Thanks for share your Boast class =) –  Daniel S. Jun 16 '14 at 14:30

Here is the Code.

final Toast toastobject = Toast.makeText(context, "This message will disappear when toast.close(); is called", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT);

Now you can use the Object of toastobject. Its Reference

toastobject.cancel();

You can use it in Thread or whenever you would like to Close the Toast.

share|improve this answer
    
Does Toast have a method called close()? –  JonA Apr 9 '12 at 7:29
    
Yes i Have given a reference so. –  Bhavin Apr 9 '12 at 7:38
    
Thank you ,but there's not a avalible "close()" method in Toast,only have a "cancel()", witch I tried(in my question above) and dose not work in my program. –  topxebec Apr 9 '12 at 7:38
    
Sorry that was my Mistake. i have changed it to cancel(); –  Bhavin Apr 9 '12 at 8:04

Toast has a method to hide current toast message

public void cancel() {
    mTN.hide();
}

Try calling t.cancel() when it is necessary.

share|improve this answer
1  
I tried it but seems it dose not work... –  topxebec Apr 9 '12 at 7:35
1  
@JonA - Yes, exactly. @topxebec - The trick is to retain that instance of the original toast - mTN. That is what catches a lot of people out. You cannot just create a new Toast and try to cancel that one - you need to cancel the original one. –  Richard Le Mesurier Jul 3 '13 at 13:24

You can reuse a toast, this will make it display immediately.

myToast.setText(toastMsg);
myToast.show();
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