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I have to filter out certain elements from an array in javascript and thought of using underscore.js for this purpose. As I am new to it,some help is appreciated.Please refer the code below , I have to find A- B and assign the result to C . Does underscore.js has any convinience method to do that ?

       function testUnderScore(){

        alert("underscore test");
        var a = [84, 99, 91, 65, 87, 55, 72, 68, 95, 42];
        var b = [ 87, 55, 72,42 ,13];
        var c = [];

        alert(c);

}
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I just found it out , c= _.without(a, b); will yeild A-B , I will also check the below answers and accept them. –  Tito Cheriachan Apr 9 '12 at 8:35
1  
Note: You should better use the proper syntax A \ B in text. –  Kay Apr 9 '12 at 8:43
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

By using difference method:

var c = _.difference(a, b);

http://documentcloud.github.com/underscore/#difference

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is this different from _.without(a, b); ? –  Tito Cheriachan Apr 9 '12 at 8:37
    
@tito .without() takes the first argument as an array, then integers subsequently, which, given your circumstance here, might not be the one you need –  SiGanteng Apr 9 '12 at 8:46
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I have to find A- B and assign the result to C . Does underscore.js has any convinience method to do that ?

Yes, you can use difference [View Docs] method:

var c = _.difference(a, b);
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gives object not found ? _.diff exists method exists ? –  Tito Cheriachan Apr 9 '12 at 8:37
2  
@tito: Use difference instead of diff. They have changed the method name in latest version. –  Sarfraz Apr 9 '12 at 8:39
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How about:

var a = [1, 2, 5, 6], b = [6], c;

c = a.filter(
    function (aItem) {
        return !(~b.indexOf(aItem));
    }
);

console.log(c);

​ ​

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sorry, fixed bugs; ~ gives 0 on (-1), so indexOf is falsy ((-1) is not a falsy value) –  Mateusz Charytoniuk Apr 9 '12 at 8:53
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