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So, I am writing a computer speeder in batch, and I am baffled by this problem:

@echo off
cls
color 02
:licence
title Computer Speeder 2012 (Free licence)
cls
echo This is the free version of Computer Speeder 2012.
echo.
echo Do you wish to license this copy? [Y]es or [N]o.
choice /c NY /n
if ERRORLEVEL 2 goto license
if ERRORLEVEL 1 goto startup1
:license
dir | find "validatecode.txt" > if exist "validatecode.txt"
goto bam
) else (
goto else
:bam
cls
echo Type in your lisencing code to validate this
echo copy to upgrade to the full version:
echo.
set /p vd=""
:else
cls 
echo You do not have a validation file on your computer,
echo if you purchased the full version you probably
echo deleted the file. Check the recycle bin, check you
echo put it in the correct path or re-purchase the
echo software because it has an individual code.
pause
goto startup1

For some odd reason, it executes all of this code chronologically: First it asks if you want to license the copy of the software. If you press Y it takes you to license. It then performs the line dir | find "validatecode.txt" >if exist "validatecode.txt" so on and so forth. However, it goes to bam and THEN goes to else. There's no other flaw in the code, I cant find any syntax error, can you guys explain what I am doing wrong? Im a noob kinda :/

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I can see you open some brackets at else line, ) else ( but I can't see you opening one before or closing it after. –  Radu Gheorghiu Apr 9 '12 at 9:57
    
Oh crap, I forgot! Of course! –  user1321527 Apr 9 '12 at 10:22
    
Fixed that bit, but it still does the same. I even tried dealing with the ifs seperately, still goes in chronological order. –  user1321527 Apr 9 '12 at 10:32
    
The program should stop after :bam, right? –  Radu Gheorghiu Apr 9 '12 at 10:36
    
No, it goes on for another 300 or so lines. Nothing wrong with anything past here though. –  user1321527 Apr 9 '12 at 10:43
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2 Answers 2

If you want the program to stop after executing :bam, you should put a

goto:EOF after set /p vd=".

:bam
cls
echo Type in your lisencing code to validate this
...
set /p vd=""
goto:EOF

:else
cls
...
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It does go on after :bam, so what do I do? –  user1321527 Apr 9 '12 at 10:52
    
I don't know if it makes any difference but please try goto:eof , with lowercase letters. The documentation supports what I say, ss64.com/nt/goto.html –  Radu Gheorghiu Apr 9 '12 at 11:19
    
turns it off, no real function. It still does not work though. –  user1321527 Apr 9 '12 at 12:53
    
Try defining a :eof lable at the end, just before the goto startup1 or after, depending on how you want your program to flow. –  Radu Gheorghiu Apr 9 '12 at 12:58
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Try replacing this:

:lisence
dir | find "validatecode.txt" > if exist "validatecode.txt"
goto bam
) else (
goto else

with this:

:lisence
if exist "validatecode.txt" goto bam
goto else

Explanation: You would need to test an errorlevel of the Find process for your code to possibly work, and the redirector '>' only creates a file called 'if', containing, oddly, the words exist and vaildatecode.txt.

Your DIR command will only look in the execution directory, but your 'bam' subroutine implies you intend to search the hard drive? True? If so, my 'if exist' command should be changed to:

dir /s/b validatecode.txt && goto bam

You appear to not be using information inside the file, so if you need to search the entire hard drive this command will perform it, and will logically go to the correct subroutine.

The snippet provided tests for a file called validatecode.txt in the local directory, and executes a goto to the label bam if it is found. If the file does not exist, focus drops to the next line, which performs a goto to the label :else.

You will need to finish your script differently as well. As it stands, if the validatecode.txt is found, you will be executing both 'bam' and 'else'. You should place a final label like :exit (:eof is reserved) and make a goto :exit command as the last line of each subroutine.

Finally, your call to the subroutine Startup1 will always fail because you have no label called Startup1.

From a flow standpoint, it looks like you have no way to exit if the user does not want to license the copy they are using.

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