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I'm making a battleships game, so when I pass something such as "A10" into the coordinate function it needs to make coloum into letter and row into the number.

Coordinate(std::string coord = "A10")
    {
        char c = coord[0];
        col = c - 16;

        int r = atoi((coord.substr(1,2)).c_str());
        row = r-1;
    };

so in this example, passing A10 should make col = 0 (A=0,B=1,C=2) and row = 9.

The row equalling 9 seems to work but col equally 0 does not.

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Ascii value of A is 65 –  AurA Apr 9 '12 at 9:49
    
You could extend your class with a custom literal. I.e: A10_C. You should even check that the passed string is in the correct format and throw an exception otherwise. –  Paranaix Apr 9 '12 at 10:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Are you trying to map the value of 'A' to zero? Remember that characters are single-byte integers,

char c = std::toupper( coord[0] );
if( c >= 'A' && c <= 'Z' )
{
    col = c - 'A';
}
else
{
    // TODO: Invalid/error?
}
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Ah this is excellent, thank you! –  R Bowen Apr 9 '12 at 10:24

It should be col = c - 'A' to get the integer for A.

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What about for each letter though? –  R Bowen Apr 9 '12 at 10:23
    
@RBowen: That code works for each letter, for A it returns 0 for B 1 etc. –  Asha Apr 9 '12 at 10:27

What you call character 'A' is just a funny name for the number 65 (its ASCII value). According to this ASCII table, 'B' = 66, 'C' = 67 and so on. So what you should do is compute int column = static_cast<int>(coord[0] - 'A').

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The decimal value for A (0x41) is 65, so you'd get 49 with your current maths. col = c - 65 should give you the desired behaviour.

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