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How do i can free mamory in next example. vt.pop_back() deletes element in vt, but it doesn't free memory. delete vt[i] doesn't work, and it give me segmentation fault.

#include <vector>
#include <unistd.h>

using namespace std;

const int SIZE = 1000000;

class Test
{
public:
    Test();
    ~Test();    
private:
    int *arr;    
};


int main()
{
    vector<Test *> vt;
    for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
        vt.push_back(new Test());
    sleep(10);
    return 0;    
}


Test::Test()
{
    arr = new int[SIZE];
}


Test::~Test()
{
    delete[] arr;
}
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3  
Why are you even using new? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 9 '12 at 10:14
    
Why delete v[i] doesn't work? There is no delete v[i] in this code. –  Rafał Rawicki Apr 9 '12 at 10:16
    
because constructor may consist arguments –  k_zaur_k Apr 9 '12 at 10:16
    
@k_zaur_k: You can use vector for arr too. –  Naveen Apr 9 '12 at 10:18
2  
I would strongly recommend not doing this. If you make a vector of pointers, attempts to copy the vector will not do what you expect, pops will need delete's, and it will generally lead to pain and suffering as you have to wrap every vector operation to make it do the right thing with the pointers and memory. Boost's ptr_vector would be an example of a much better way to do this. –  David Schwartz Apr 9 '12 at 10:19
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You are not storing "Test" objects, you are storing pointers to these objects. So delete does nothing but delete the pointers.

If you want your objects to be stored in the vector you should make the type

vector<Test>

This way the delete calls actually run the destructor of the objects.

The resulting code becomes:

int main() 
{
    vector<Test> vt; 
    for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++) 
        vt.push_back(Test());
    sleep(10);
    return 0;
}

As commented this also requires a new copy constructor:

Test::Test(const Test& t)
{
    arr = new int[SIZE];
    for(int i = 0; i != SIZE; i++)
        arr[i] = t.arr[i];
}
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1  
Don't worry, I'm not stealing anything ;) Happens all the time: I take too long to post an answer and end up deleting it because there's a similar one already :) Have a +1. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 9 '12 at 10:24
1  
but vector<Test> vt; for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++) vt.push_back(Test()); doesn't work –  k_zaur_k Apr 9 '12 at 10:27
1  
@R.Martinho - Your answer was more complete and I was going to upvote it because of that. And then it just disappeared... –  Bo Persson Apr 9 '12 at 10:27
1  
if i write vector<Test> vt; for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++) vt.push_back(Test()); g++ main.cpp -o main && ./main gives me segmentation fault; –  k_zaur_k Apr 9 '12 at 10:33
1  
@k_zaur_k: That's because your Test class breaks the Rule of Three and can't be safely copied. push_back copies a temporary object into the vector, and destroys the original, deleting the array it allocated. –  Mike Seymour Apr 9 '12 at 10:38
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You can use delete vt[i] like this, it will free the memory allocated to Test objects:

for(size_t i = 0; i < vt.size(); ++i)
{
   delete vt[i];
}
vt.clear();
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You are storing pointers and not objects, therefor the "pointer object" is going to be destroyed if you destroy your vector but not the object the pointer points to

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If you want to delete specific elements, you could try using the function erase of std::vector.

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