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in ASP.NET MVC I have an Action that accepts a list of email addresses entered by the user, validates them and then sends HTML and text version of email message to each recipient. User is then redirected to the thanks page. Because it is not necessary to wait with the redirect to thanks page until all email messages are sent, I am using Task.Factory.StartNew method to start a new task that actually sends email messages and it works fine; the user is immediately redirected to the thanks page and email messages are sent on a separate thread. So everything works as I want to, but nevertheless I have the following questions regarding the multi-threading. I read quite a lot of posts last days, but I still do not have all the answers, here are some facts that I have extracted from these posts (note that these are my assumptions only and I write them down here, so you can comment and improve them):

  1. Task library uses thread from thread pool

    If you are using Task library, your are creating new thread by using thread from ASP.NET thread pool. That means that one thread less is available for serving other ASP.NET requests for the application. So by using task library your are not optimizing usage of ASP.NET threads by offloading tasks to some other OS thread, only user experience is better, but Task library uses another thread that could be used for serving other ASP.NET requests. So the only consequence is that the user does not need to wait.

  2. Manual thread

    If you really want to use OS threads, you must start new Thread explicitly. But even if you start new OS thread, you need to have machine with multiple cores or processors to really see an improvement in application scalability.

  3. Background thread pool

    Some posts talk about ASP.NET thread pool and a separate application's background thread pool which is used for background tasks. In other words, each ASP.NET application has one thread pool to serve application requests and another thread pool to serve background tasks. I do not think that's true, I think each ASP.NET application has only one thread pool and threads from this pool are used to server both: application requests and background tasks. Maybe this could be said for Windows Forms application when there's usually only one thread running (UI thread) and you must explicitly start new thread. But ASP.NET is multi-threaded in its basics.

Here are the questions:

  1. I have read about async MVC controllers in Programming ASP.NET MVC 2 by Dino Esposito. He writes about how async controller uses OS thread for long running task and thus ASP.NET thread that served ASP.NET request initially is now free to server other requests.

    Although I do not need async controller here, my questions is how can I use such OS thread in my example. Do I have to start separate thread explicitly or is this also somehow possible with Task library?

  2. Even if I offload such taks to some OS thread will there be any benefit if the machine only has one processor? I think multi-core machine is necessary to really improve the scalability of the application.

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[…] He writes about how async controller uses OS thread for long running task and thus ASP.NET thread that served ASP.NET request initially is now free to server other requests.

Well, that depends on what code do you have in that async controller. It could execute some code on a OS Thread, but it doesn't have to. What usually happens is that you start some async operation that doesn't use any threads while running. And when it finishes, the result executes back on some ThreadPool thread.

Although I do not need async controller here, my questions is how can I use such OS thread in my example. Do I have to start separate thread explicitly or is this also somehow possible with Task library?

You can start a new thread by using TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning. This isn't guaranteed to start a new thread, but in practice it does.

Even if I offload such taks to some OS thread will there be any benefit if the machine only has one processor? I think multi-core machine is necessary to really improve the scalability of the application.

There can be benefit if that thread executes some IO bound operation synchronously. For example, most of the time it takes to send an email is most likely not spend using CPU, but waiting for a server to respond. If that's the case, using another thread (whether separate thread or one from a ThreadPool) can be beneficial. Of course, it would be even better if you execute that operation asynchronously, which won't block any thread, but that may make your code much more complicated (and there may cases where it's not even possible).

Regarding other things you wrote:

If you are using Task library, your are creating new thread by using thread from ASP.NET thread pool. That means that one thread less is available for serving other ASP.NET requests for the application

Yes, under normal circumstances (if you use the default TaskScheduler and don't specify TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning). But if you're running into problems with that, a better solution may be to increase the ThreadPool limits and not create Threads by yourself for short running tasks. That's because creating and destroying threads is an expensive operation and you should avoid it if performance matters to you.

[E]ach ASP.NET application has one thread pool to serve application requests and another thread pool to serve background tasks. I do not think that's true, I think each ASP.NET application has only one thread pool and threads from this pool are used to server both: application requests and background tasks.

It's slightly more complicated than that, but yes, ASP.NET requests and ThreadPool tasks (started using ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem() or by starting a Task with the default options) are run on the same pool of threads.

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svick, thanks. To summarize, Task uses thread from thread pool by default. If you specify TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning, probably new non-threadpool thread will be used. For short running tasks it is better to increase number of threads in thread pool than to create non-threadpool threads. Non-threadpool threads should only be used with long running tasks that could hurt performance by using thread pool threads. –  JXC Apr 10 '12 at 7:40
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The real problem you have is that ASP.NET can recycle your AppDomain at any time. When this happens, your background thread will be aborted with extreme prejudice. It doesn't matter if you use a thread pool thread or start your own thread - if ASP.NET doesn't "know" about the thread, it can and will destroy the AppDomain and take your thread with it.

The "proper" solution is to have a separate Windows Service process that is a WCF server. Your web app can then send commands to the service, which executes them - e.g. sends some emails.

The quick and dirty way is to have a hidden Action in your web app that sends the emails. Start an asynchronous request to that Action and then return the "thanks" page without waiting for the result. ASP.NET doesn't care that the request is from within your app - it just treats it as another request. Because ASP.NET "knows" about the request, it will not abort it.

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