Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have below code which overrides equals() and hashcode() methods.

public boolean equals(Object obj)
 {
   if (obj == null)
     return false;
   if (!(obj instanceof Name))
     return false;
   Name name = (Name) obj;
   return this.name.equals(name.name);
 }

 public int hashCode()
 {
   return name.hashCode();
 }

here can i replace below 2 lines:

return this.name.equals(name.name);
return name.hashCode();

with

return this.getName().equals(name.getName());
return getName().hashCode();

i mean instead of using properties can i directly use getters inside equals and hashcode methods?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
and why not? :) –  Adel Boutros Apr 9 '12 at 10:53
    
yes, There isn't any problem. –  MJM Apr 9 '12 at 10:59
    
yes. You just can't use setters or fields which can be modified when the object is in a collection. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 9 '12 at 11:02
    
BTW: !(null instanceof Name) is always true so the first check is redundant. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 9 '12 at 11:02
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can, but why would you? Option A: the compiler inlines that, so you end up with a reference to the field anyway. Option B: The compiler does not inline the call, i.e. you've introduced one extra method call.

There are also implications for legibility- if the name field is directly accessible within the class, why not refer to it directly? I find this easier to read, but some people find it inconsistent.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Yes sure you could use this,

hashcode() and equals() are field methods, They can access private members directly, but what if there is some logic wrapped in accessor method, so it is always safe to access fields using accessor methods

share|improve this answer
add comment

Yes, why would you not be able to?

In future, with things like this, I recommend you just give it a try and see.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Yes you can. Why not? What's your doubts?

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.