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I have many collections for many types I want to sort each collection by different properties. For example IEnumerable<Employee> will be sorted by Name and Age properties,and IEnumerable<Department> will be sorted by NumberOfEmployees and DepartmentName properties. I use PaginatedList to paginating the collection after sorting it.

public class PaginatedList<T> : List<T>
{
  public PaginatedList(IEnumerable<T> source, Int32 pageIndex, Int32 pageSize , Func<T,Object> orderBy)
  {
    this.AddRange(source.OrderBy(orderBy).Skip((PageIndex - 1) * PageSize).Take(PageSize));
  }
}

Note the 4th parameter which is the sorting delegate that will be passed to OrderBy extension method.

I am using a generic method to generate this 4th element

public Func<T, Object> SortingFactory<T>(String sortby) 
{
  switch (typeof(T).ToString())
  {
    case "Employee":
      switch(sortby)
      {
        case "Name":
           return new Func<Employee,String>(delegate(Employee e) { return e.Name; });
           break;                            
        case "Age":
           return new Func<Employee,Int32>(delegate(Employee e) { return e.Age; });
           break;
      }
      break;
    case "Department":
      switch(sortby)
      {
        case "NumberOfEmployees":
           return new Func<Department,Int32>(delegate(Department d) { return d.NumberOfEmployees; });
           break;                            
        case "DepartmentName":
           return new Func<Department,String>(delegate(Department d) { return d.DepartmentName; });
           break;
      }
      break;
  }
}

but it gives me a compilation ErrorCannot implicitly convert type 'System.Func<Employee,String>' to 'System.Func<T,object>'

I also tried to decalre the output as Func<Object,Object> but I got the same error.

What is the fault I made and how do such method.

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1  
#1: you are not showing us the line where the error occurs. #2: SortingFactory is simply hideous and has no reason to exist. How is writing .OrderBy(SortingFactory<Employee>("Name")) better than writing .OrderBy(e => e.Name)? –  Jon Apr 9 '12 at 11:13
    
@Jon No SortingFactory has reason to exist. using .OrderBy(e => e.Name) is not generic I need to use PaginatedList<T> to all collection I have. –  Amir Ismail Apr 9 '12 at 11:51
1  
@Jon .OrderBy(SortingFactory<Employee>(userSuppliedString)) –  David B Apr 11 '12 at 16:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Say I understood well

public class PaginatedList<T> : List<T>
{
  public PaginatedList(IEnumerable<T> source, Int32 pageIndex, Int32 pageSize )
  {
    this.AddRange(GetOrderFor<T>().Skip((PageIndex - 1) * PageSize).Take(PageSize));
  }
}

public static class Helpers
    {

        public static Func<T, object> GetSortExpression<T>(string sortExpressionStr)
        {
            var param = Expression.Parameter(typeof (T), "x");
            var sortExpression = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, object>>(Expression.Convert(Expression.Property(param, sortExpressionStr), typeof(object)), param);
            return sortExpression.Compile();
        }

        public static IOrderedEnumerable<T> GetOrderFor<T>(this IEnumerable<T> list)
        {
            switch (typeof (T).Name)
            {
                case "Employee":
                    return list.OrderBy(GetSortExpression<T>("Name")).ThenBy(GetSortExpression<T>("Age"));
                case "Category":
                    return list.OrderBy(GetSortExpression<T>("Name")).ThenBy(GetSortExpression <T> ("Id"));
            }
            return null;
        }
    }

And if I misunderstood, I think the simple usage of GetSortExpression method can help you to avoid your error

case "Employee":
      switch(sortby)
      {
        case "Name":
           return Helpers.GetSortExpression<T>("Name");                           
        case "Age":
           return Helpers.GetSortExpression<T>("Age");
      }
share|improve this answer
    
I think even if you misunderstand me, the first approach is better,but I am not sure,Is Expression.Compile has performance drawbacks –  Amir Ismail Apr 9 '12 at 14:09

The main problem with your code stems from trying to convert between generic types. The solution given here should avoid that.

You should be able to make use of the Comparer<T> class. Here is an example for sorting Employees:

class EmployeeComparer : Comparer<Employee>
{
    string property;

    public EmployeeComparer(string Property)
    {
        this.property = Property;
    }

    public override int Compare(Employee x, Employee y)
    {
        switch (this.property)
        {
            case "Name":
                return Comparer<string>.Default.Compare(x.Name, y.Name);
            case "Age":
                return Comparer<int>.Default.Compare(x.Age, y.Age);
            default:
                return 0;
        }
    }
}

The DepartmentComparer would be very similar.

EDIT: Here is the property field abstracted to a base class, with the revised EmployeeComparer:

abstract class PropertyComparer<T> : Comparer<T>
{
    protected string property;

    public PropertyComparer(string Property)
    {
        this.property = Property;
    }
}

class EmployeeComparer : PropertyComparer<Employee>
{
    public EmployeeComparer(string Property) : base(Property)
    {

    }

    public override int Compare(Employee x, Employee y)
    ...
}

Then you could write a function to get a comparer for the required type:

Comparer<T> GetComparer(string Property)
{
    // Sadly, you cannot switch on a Type
    if (typeof(T) == typeof(Employee))
    {
        return new EmployeeComparer(Property) as Comparer<T>;
    }
    else if (typeof(T) == typeof(Department))
    {
        return new DepartmentComparer(Property) as Comparer<T>;
    }
    else
    {
        return Comparer<T>.Default;
    }
}

That would most likely belong in the PaginatedList class:

public class PaginatedList<T> : List<T>
{
    Comparer<T> GetComparer(string Property)
    ...

    public PaginatedList(IEnumerable<T> source, int pageIndex, int pageSize, string orderBy)
    {
        Comparer<T> comparer = GetComparer(orderBy);
        this.AddRange(source.OrderBy(x => x, comparer).Skip((PageIndex - 1) * PageSize).Take(PageSize));
    }
}

HTH. I didn't test it, but if you find a bug, just comment.

share|improve this answer
    
your answer is so simple but with it I have to write a Comparer<T> for each type in my application. Is There way to write just one Comparer class? –  Amir Ismail Apr 9 '12 at 14:05
    
Not that I know of. The EmployeeComparer class is quite simple, and you can easily create copies of it for different types, without too much work. –  Kendall Frey Apr 9 '12 at 14:11
    
Yes I can copy it but what about DRY –  Amir Ismail Apr 9 '12 at 14:20
    
The only thing that is being repeated is the property field. If you don't want to have that repeated, I will add some code for putting that in a base class. –  Kendall Frey Apr 9 '12 at 14:27

You need a more generic version of SortingFactory, one that will return a lambda of any type. Basically this converts a string into a strongly typed Expression usable for sorting:

public Expression<Func<T, To>> SortingFactory<T, To>( String sortby )
{
    // Entity type
    System.Type dataType = typeof( T );

    // Entity - main parameter (x =>
    ParameterExpression rootExp = Expression.Parameter(dataType, "x" );

    // property (x => x.Property
    PropertyInfo pi = dataType.GetProperty( sortby );

    // put together
    Expression expr = Expression.Property( rootExp, pi );
    return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, To>>( expr, rootExp );
}

I don't have it in, but you may want to check that pi is not null. This also assumes the incoming string is a scalar property, not an Entity or a collection - that get's a bit trickier.

share|improve this answer
Cannot implicitly convert type 'System.Func<Employee,String>' to 'System.Func<T,object>'

This error is telling you that Func<X, string> does not inherit from Func<X, object> (even though string inherits from object). This is a very common Generics mistake! List<Customer> does not inherit from List<object>. If it did, you could get away with this:

List<Customer> c = new List<Customer>();
List<object> x = (List<object>) c;
x.Add(x)
//List<object> is-a object, so the statement is valid,
//  but a List<Customer> is not a Customer, breaks the instance referenced by c
// instead of breaking c's instance, you get a runtime exception on line 2 - invalid cast.

Many answers are turning to expression maniupulation stuff. I feel that is too heavy of a hammer to swing at this problem...

What you need to do is remove/hide that second generic parameter, as I have done here.

public interface IOrderer<T>
{
  IOrderedEnumerable<T> ApplyOrderBy(IEnumerable<T> source);
  IOrderedEnumerable<T> ApplyOrderByDescending(IEnumerable<T> source);
  IOrderedEnumerable<T> ApplyThenBy(IOrderedEnumerable<T> source);
  IOrderedEnumerable<T> ApplyThenByDescending(IOrderedEnumerable<T> source);
} 

public class Orderer<T, U> : IOrderer<T>
{
  private Func<T, U> _orderFunc;
  public Orderer(Func<T, U> orderFunc)
  { _orderFunc = orderFunc; }
  public IOrderedEnumerable<T> ApplyOrderBy(IEnumerable<T> source)
  { return source.OrderBy(_orderFunc); }
  public IOrderedEnumerable<T> ApplyOrderByDescending(IEnumerable<T> source)
  { return source.OrderByDescending(_orderFunc); }
  public IOrderedEnumerable<T> ApplyThenBy(IOrderedEnumerable<T> source)
  { return source.ThenBy(_orderFunc); }
  public IOrderedEnumerable<T> ApplyThenByDescending(IOrderedEnumerable<T> source)
  { return source.ThenByDescending(_orderFunc); }
}  

Then your method:

public class PaginatedList<T> : List<T>
{
  public PaginatedList(
    IEnumerable<T> source,
    Int32 pageIndex, Int32 pageSize,
    IOrderer<T> orderer)
  {
    IEnumerable<T> query = orderer.ApplyOrderBy(source)
      .Skip((PageIndex - 1) * PageSize)
      .Take(PageSize)  
    this.AddRange(query);
  }
} 

Or, when you want multiple sorting (as will inevitably happen), this:

public class PaginatedList<T> : List<T>
{
  public PaginatedList(
    IEnumerable<T> source,
    Int32 pageIndex, Int32 pageSize,
    List<IOrderer<T>> orderers)
  {
    IEnumerable<T> query = source;

    if (orderers.Any())
    {
      IOrderer<T> firstOrder = orderers.First();
      IOrderedEnumerable<T> orderedQuery = firstOrder.ApplyOrderBy(source);
      foreach(IOrderer<T> nextOrder in orderers.Skip(1))
      {
        orderedQuery = nextOrder.ApplyThenBy(orderedQuery);
      }
      query = orderedQuery;
    }

    this.AddRange(query.Skip((PageIndex - 1) * PageSize).Take(PageSize));
  }
} 

After that, you just need to add some property to IOrderer and Orderer so that it knows if it should be asc/desc, and you should have ordering all wrapped up.


(more fun, your sorting factory)

public IOrderer<T> SortingFactory<T>(String sortby)
{
  switch (typeof(T).ToString())
  {
    case "Employee":
       switch(sortby)
       {
         case "Name":
            return new Orderer<Employee, string>(e => e.Name); //hmm, not sure this will work.
            break;  
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