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I found that creation of a class is way slower than instantiation of a class.

>>> from timeit import Timer as T
>>> def calc(n):
...     return T("class Haha(object): pass").timeit(n)

<<After several these 'calc' things, at least one of them have a big number, eg. 100000>>

>>> calc(9000)
15.947055101394653
>>> calc(9000)
17.39099097251892
>>> calc(9000)
18.824054956436157
>>> calc(9000)
20.33335590362549

Yeah, create 9000 classes took 16 secs, and becomes even slower in the subsequent calls.

And this:

>>> T("type('Haha', b, d)", "b = (object, ); d = {}").timeit(9000)

gives similar results.

But instantiation don't suffer:

>>> T("Haha()", "class Haha(object): pass").timeit(5000000)
0.8786070346832275

5000000 instances in less than one sec.

What makes the creation this expensive?

And why the creation process become slower?

EDIT:

How to reproduce:

start a fresh python process, the initial several "calc(10000)"s give a number of 0.5 on my machine. And try some bigger values, calc(100000), it can't end in even 10secs, interrupt it, and calc(10000), gives a 15sec.

EDIT:

Additional fact:

If you gc.collect() after 'calc' becomes slow, you can get the 'normal' speed at beginning, but the timing will increasing in subsequent calls

>>> from a import calc
>>> calc(10000)
0.4673938751220703
>>> calc(10000)
0.4300072193145752
>>> calc(10000)
0.4270968437194824
>>> calc(10000)
0.42754602432250977
>>> calc(10000)
0.4344758987426758
>>> calc(100000)
^CTraceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "a.py", line 3, in calc
    return T("class Haha(object): pass").timeit(n)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/timeit.py", line 194, in timeit
    timing = self.inner(it, self.timer)
  File "<timeit-src>", line 6, in inner
KeyboardInterrupt
>>> import gc
>>> gc.collect()
234204
>>> calc(10000)
0.4237039089202881
>>> calc(10000)
1.5998330116271973
>>> calc(10000)
4.136359930038452
>>> calc(10000)
6.625348806381226
share|improve this question
3  
Why does this matter? In any case, your timings are affected by the load on your system at the time. They are really only useful for comparisons performed at pretty much the same time. I get about 0.5s for 9000 class creations. –  Marcin Apr 9 '12 at 11:35
6  
@Marcin: there's a 1000x difference.. why are you nit-picking about those small details? –  Karoly Horvath Apr 9 '12 at 11:45
1  
@Marcin: huh? of course you cannot replicate the exact values ... but the magnitudes should be the same (the argument of timeit is the key thing here!). –  Karoly Horvath Apr 9 '12 at 12:07
4  
@Marcin you have just proven that OP has a slower computer than ideone. Go try with 5000000 class creations and compare it with 5000000 instance creations and tell us it's equally fast. The distance will obviously change, the point was that T(creation) > T(instantiation) –  soulcheck Apr 9 '12 at 12:21
2  
@Marcin very slow is a relative term and obviously dependent on the machine parameters and personal taste. java was very slow on machines used 15 years ago and now you have minecraft ;) –  soulcheck Apr 9 '12 at 12:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 25 down vote accepted

This might give you the intuition:

>>> class Haha(object): pass
...
>>> sys.getsizeof(Haha)
904
>>> sys.getsizeof(Haha())
64

Class object is much more complex and expensive structure than an instance of that class.

share|improve this answer
    
Don't know this func before, thx! –  Proton Apr 9 '12 at 12:02

A quick dis of the following functions:

def a():
    class Haha(object):
         pass



def b():
    Haha()

gives:

2           0 LOAD_CONST               1 ('Haha')
            3 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (object)
            6 BUILD_TUPLE              1
            9 LOAD_CONST               2 (<code object Haha at 0x7ff3e468bab0, file "<stdin>", line 2>)
            12 MAKE_FUNCTION            0
            15 CALL_FUNCTION            0
            18 BUILD_CLASS         
            19 STORE_FAST               0 (Haha)
            22 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
            25 RETURN_VALUE        

and

2           0 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (Haha)
            3 CALL_FUNCTION            0
            6 POP_TOP             
            7 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
            10 RETURN_VALUE        

accordingly.

By the looks of it, it simply does more stuff when creating a class. It has to initialize class, add it to dicts, and wherever else, while in case of Haha() is just calls a function.

As you noticed doing garbage collection when it gets's too slow speeds stuff up again, so Marcin's right in saying that it's probably memory fragmentation issue.

share|improve this answer
    
This does not account for the behaviour OP is seeing, because these operations are simply not that expensive, and do not take that long anywhere else. –  Marcin Apr 9 '12 at 12:06
    
@Marcin The first operation DOES take more time, even if both are cheap. You can argue about methodology all you want but you won't change the fact that the first one simply has to be slower due to the fact that it does some extra operations instead of simply doing CALL_FUNCTION. Things can be different (ie when __init__ is not empty and does something), but that's not the case here. –  soulcheck Apr 9 '12 at 12:11
    
I'm not denying that class creation takes more time. I'm denying that the behaviour OP claims to have observed is real. Class creation is simply not that expensive. –  Marcin Apr 9 '12 at 12:14

Ahahaha! Gotcha!

Was this perchance done on a Python version without this patch? (HINT: IT WAS)

Check the line numbers if you want proof.

Marcin was right: when the results look screwy you've probably got a screwy benchmark. Run gc.disable() and the results reproduce themselves. It just shows that when you disable garbage collection you get garbage results!


To be more clear, the reason running the long benchmark broke things is that:

  • timeit disables garbage collections, so overly large benchmarks take much (exponentially) longer

  • timeit wasn't restoring garbage collection on exceptions

  • You quit the long-running process with an asynchronous exception, turning off garbage collection

share|improve this answer
    
Great answer, good job identifying the root cause of the gotcha. –  Marcin Sep 4 '14 at 13:17

It isn't: Only your contrived tests show slow class creation. In fact, as @Veedrac shows in his answer, this result is an artifact of timeit disabling garbage collection.

Downvoters: Show me a non-contrived example where class creation is slow.

In any case, your timings are affected by the load on your system at the time. They are really only useful for comparisons performed at pretty much the same time. I get about 0.5s for 9000 class creations. In fact, it's about 0.3s on ideone, even when performed repeatedly: http://ideone.com/Du859. There isn't even an upward trend.

So, in summary, it is much slower on your computer than others, and there is no upwards trend on other computers for repeated tests (as per your original claim). Testing massive numbers of instantiations does show slowing down, presumably because the process consumes a lot of memory. You have shown that allocating a huge amount of memory slows a process down. Well done.

That ideone code in full:

from timeit import Timer as T
def calc(n):
return T("class Haha(object): pass").timeit(n)

for i in xrange(30):
print calc(9000)
share|improve this answer
6  
1) curiosity... sometimes i need create classes dynamically, so i did some experiment, and found this. 2) If I start a fresh python process and do the timing, i get 0.37sec, but it will become slower if you continue do the same thing. –  Proton Apr 9 '12 at 11:42
2  
Yeah, not representative. I got these numbers after 100k class creation(or more). –  Proton Apr 9 '12 at 12:24
2  
Do you mean you can't reproduce the result above? –  Proton Apr 9 '12 at 12:30
2  
Try this: start a fresh python process, the initial several "calc(10000)"s give a number of 0.5 on my machine. And try some bigger values, calc(100000), it can't end in even 10secs, interrupt it, and calc(10000), gives a 15sec. –  Proton Apr 9 '12 at 12:34
2  
+1; quite apart from whether there's a trend or not (I can't observe it on my machine for repeating, though for selecting a larger number I can), it's contrived and implementing a system which would do such things would be the Wrong Way. Now I'll see how my similar answer fares... –  Chris Morgan Apr 9 '12 at 14:21

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