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Solved by adding fseek(file, 0, 0) once finished a repsonse.

I am programming a very simple http server, which will reply any GET request with a HTTP response. The response content will be passed to the program when it started, e.g.

$./server test1.html 999

This command will open listen to 999 port, if got any GET request, the server will send "http headers" + "content of test1.html" to the requesting client.

The fork() part doesn't work well, I can get the correct response for the first time, but after that, new clients won't receive anything from the server (cookies and cache are cleared).

I debugged, the program would fprintf() the correct content, the problem is "client won't receive them".

Below is my code, there is a function called get_mime_type(), you can ignore it and set mime to "text/html" or whatever you want.

Any hints?

BTW, I also want to avoid using multiple process to handle multiple connections, any idea on implementing a single-process, single-threaded http server?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <netdb.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <dirent.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#define BACKLOG 1024
#define RFC1123FMT "%a, %d %b %Y %H:%M:%S GMT"
#define DEBUG 1

/**
 * Get the mime type of a file
 *
 * Pre-Condition: 1. mime-types.tsv is in current directory, and it is correct
 *                2. file exists and all right
 */
char *get_mime_type(char *filename) {
  // Get extension
  char *ext;   // file extension
  if ((ext = strrchr(filename, '.')) == NULL) {
    fprintf(stderr, "Error: Cannot get the extension of \"%s\".\n", filename);
    exit(1);
  }
  ext += sizeof(char);  // get rid of the `.'

  // Read in mime-types.tsv and try to get the mime-type regarding to current file's extension
  // No detailed error-checking according to pre-condition
  FILE *mime_file;
  mime_file = fopen("mime-types.tsv", "r");

  int BUF_MAX = 1024;
  char *buffer = (char *)malloc(sizeof(char) * BUF_MAX);
  char *mime;
  fgets(buffer, BUF_MAX, mime_file);
  int linum = atoi(buffer);
  while (linum-- > 0) {
    fgets(buffer, BUF_MAX, mime_file);
    if ((strncasecmp(buffer, ext, strlen(ext))) == 0) {
      buffer[strlen(buffer) - 1] = '\0';
      mime = buffer;
      while (*mime != ' ') {
    mime += sizeof(char);
      }
      mime += sizeof(char);
      free(buffer);   // TODO: is this all right?
      fclose(mime_file);
      return mime;
    }
  }
  free(buffer);
  fclose(mime_file);
  return NULL;
}

void sigchld_handler(int s)
{
  while(waitpid(-1, NULL, WNOHANG) > 0);
}

/**
 * Get sockaddr, IPv4 or IPv6:
 */
void *get_in_addr(struct sockaddr *sig_action)
{
  if (sig_action->sa_family == AF_INET) {
    return &(((struct sockaddr_in*)sig_action)->sin_addr);
  }

  return &(((struct sockaddr_in6*)sig_action)->sin6_addr);
}


/**
 * Open a socket and listen to it, send information once got requests
 */
int run_server(char *filename, char *port) {
  // open file and get its information
  FILE *file;
  struct stat statbuf;
  if (stat(filename, &statbuf) < 0) {
    fprintf(stderr, "Error: Unable to open \"%s\".\n", filename);
    exit(1);
  }
  if (S_ISDIR(statbuf.st_mode)) {
    fprintf(stderr, "Error: %s is a directory, expected a file.\n", filename);
    exit(1);
  }
  if ((file = fopen(filename, "r")) == NULL) {
    fprintf(stderr, "Error: Unable to open \"%s\".\n", filename);
    exit(1);
  }
  char *mime = get_mime_type(filename);
  if (mime == NULL) {
    fprintf(stderr, "Error: the type of \"%s\" cannot be recognised.\n", filename);
    exit(1);
  }
  int file_len = S_ISREG(statbuf.st_mode) ? statbuf.st_size : -1;
  time_t mtime = statbuf.st_mtime; // last modified time, used in header

  // init sock
  int server_fd, client_fd;
  struct addrinfo hints, *server_info, *p_server_info;
  struct sockaddr_storage client_addr;
  socklen_t sock_in_size;
  struct sigaction sig_action;
  int yes = 1;
  char client_ip[INET6_ADDRSTRLEN];
  int return_value; // store return value of getaddrinfo

  memset(&hints, 0, sizeof(hints));
  hints.ai_family = AF_UNSPEC;
  hints.ai_socktype = SOCK_STREAM;
  hints.ai_flags = AI_PASSIVE;

  if ((return_value = getaddrinfo(NULL, port, &hints, &server_info)) != 0) {
    fprintf(stderr, "getaddrinfo: %s\n", gai_strerror(return_value));
    return 1;
  }
  // TODO ? free hints? free p_server_info
  // bind
  for (p_server_info = server_info; p_server_info != NULL; p_server_info = p_server_info->ai_next) {
    if ((server_fd = socket(p_server_info->ai_family, p_server_info->ai_socktype,
                p_server_info->ai_protocol)) == -1) {
      perror("server: socket");
      continue;
    }

    if (setsockopt(server_fd, SOL_SOCKET, SO_REUSEADDR, &yes,
           sizeof(int)) == -1) {
      perror("setsockopt");
      exit(1);
    }

    if (bind(server_fd, p_server_info->ai_addr, p_server_info->ai_addrlen) == -1) {
      close(server_fd);
      perror("server: bind");
      continue;
    }
    break;
  }

  if (p_server_info == NULL) { // not bind
    fprintf(stderr, "server: failed to bind\n");
    return 2;
  }

  freeaddrinfo(server_info);

  // listen
  if (listen(server_fd, BACKLOG) == -1) {
    perror("listen");
    exit(1);
  }

  // reap dead processes
  sig_action.sa_handler = sigchld_handler;
  sigemptyset(&sig_action.sa_mask);
  sig_action.sa_flags = SA_RESTART;
  if (sigaction(SIGCHLD, &sig_action, NULL) == -1) {
    perror("sigaction");
    exit(1);
  }

  printf("server: waiting for connections...\n");

  while (1) {
    sock_in_size = sizeof(client_addr);
    client_fd = accept(server_fd, (struct sockaddr *) &client_addr, &sock_in_size);
    if (client_fd == -1) {
      perror("accept");
      continue;
    }
    inet_ntop(client_addr.ss_family,
          get_in_addr((struct sockaddr *)&client_addr),
          client_ip, sizeof(client_ip));
    printf("server: got connection from %s\n", client_ip);

    if (!fork()) { // child process
      close(server_fd);
      FILE* response = fdopen(client_fd, "a+"); // response file
      // response header
      time_t now;
      char timebuf[128];
      now = time(NULL);
      strftime(timebuf, sizeof(timebuf), RFC1123FMT, gmtime(&now));

      fprintf(response, "HTTP/1.1 200 OK\r\n");
      fprintf(response, "Server: server\r\n");
      fprintf(response, "Date: %s\r\n", timebuf);

      strftime(timebuf, sizeof(timebuf), RFC1123FMT, gmtime(&mtime));
      fprintf(response, "Last-Modified: %s\r\n", timebuf);
      fprintf(response, "Content-Type: %s\r\n", mime);
      fprintf(response, "Content-Length: %d\r\n", file_len);
      fprintf(response, "Connection: close\r\n");
      fprintf(response, "\r\n");

      // response content
      char buf[1024];
      int n;
      while ((n = fread(buf, 1, sizeof(buf), file)) > 0) {
        fwrite(buf, 1, n, response);
      }
      fclose(response);
      fclose(file);
      close(client_fd);
      exit(0);
    }
  }
  fclose(file);
  close(server_fd);
  return 0;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  if (argc != 3) {
    fprintf(stderr, "Usage: $server filename port\n");
    exit(1);
  }
  char *filename = argv[1];
  char *port = argv[2];
  return run_server(filename, port);
}
share|improve this question
    
why do you think fork is the problem? BTW have you ever seen this message server: got connection from ..? –  Karoly Horvath Apr 9 '12 at 12:42
    
Yes, I tested it on my own laptop, I cleared cookie and cache of firefox before each connection, the server will got the connection from 127.0.0.1. I think it's the mistake happened in fork() part because the first connection works well, but following connection will not receive any response, Firefox will keep loading until timeout –  Wenshan Apr 9 '12 at 23:22

3 Answers 3

BTW, I also want to avoid using multiple process to handle multiple connections, any idea on implementing a single-process, single-threaded http server?

You may want to look at select()/poll()/epoll() all of them provide a mechanism to check if any of the watched filedescriptors is available for reading or writing. If you want to learn more about event driven programming, I'd recommend implementing the server on your own using epoll().

If you do not want to write all the event handling code (which is really boring, trust me) take a look at libevent. Besides the event handling framework, it also provides a very basic HTTP-Server which you may want to look at.

share|improve this answer

The free() in get_mime_type() at the end of the loop is not allright. mime points into it, and you return mime to the caller.

BTW: (sizeof (char) == 1), and you should not cast malloc()s return value.

for (p_server_info = server_info; p_server_info != NULL; p_server_info = p_server_info->ai_next) {
    if ((server_fd = socket(p_server_info->ai_family, p_server_info->ai_socktype,
                p_server_info->ai_protocol)) == -1) {
      perror("server: socket");
      continue;
    }

It appears you have a linked list of struct server info. For every element of the list you are allocating a socket, but server_fd is reassigned at every loop iteration. It appears that for a list length of > 1 you are leaking file descriptors here.

// response content
      char buf[1024];
      int n;
      while ((n = fread(buf, 1, sizeof(buf), file)) > 0) {
        fwrite(buf, 1, n, response);
      }

You need to check and use the return value from fwrite() here. response is an fdopen()ed filedescriptor which may not be completerly writable at any moment.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot, very helpful. The for loop actually will be terminated after a successful bind. I think it works because the first connection with my simple server works well, the problem should be in the while loop or may be there are some mistakes in the settings, such as sigaction.sa_handler. –  Wenshan Apr 10 '12 at 4:14

"Simple" and "HTTP" don't mix well. The HTTP standard (e.g. RFC2616, etc.) is complex (more than a hundred pages). Don't pretend implement fully that complex protocol fully in a simple self-contained program.

So you either will implement a small incomplete subset of HTTP (which might not work with most browsers or HTTP clients), or you have to use something which helps you making a full HTTP server, e.g. some HTTP server library like onion or libmicrohttpd (and they are not very simple anymore), or plugin your web application, perhaps using fastcgi (or SCGI, Jserve, etc..) to "connect" or "plug" it inside a real Web server.

share|improve this answer
2  
You aren't answering his question and only giving your opinion that he shouldn't do this. –  Rob Apr 9 '12 at 12:25
    
I am suggesting alternative solutions: HTTP libraries or technology (eg FastCGI) to use an existing HTTP server. I pretend there cannot be any simple fully standard conforming HTTP server. –  Basile Starynkevitch Apr 9 '12 at 12:26
1  
Thanks for your reply anyway, it is not a "serious" program, just for learning purpose. What I want to do is implementing a very small subset of HTTP. I got stuck with the the fork() part. –  Wenshan Apr 9 '12 at 12:40
1  
I think the OP never intended to write a full spec compilant server in 200 lines (and BTW implementing 1% of the spec is enough to fulfill most of the needs of the clients if you serve only static pages) –  Karoly Horvath Apr 9 '12 at 12:41

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