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For my program I need to make a list of lists, with each sublist containing 2 numbers, X and Y along with the sum and product of these 2 numbers. So far I have the following:

genList(95, X,[]):-!.
genList(N, X,[[X,Y,Sum,Product]|Xs]):-
    Y is N+1,
    Sum is X+Y,
    Sum<101,
    Product is X*Y,
    N1 is N+1,
    genList(N1, X,Xs).

This works just fine for my test case of genList(5,5,Q). However, I'm having trouble making it work for any starting number.

The goal is to find every pair of numbers where sum<= 100. So running through the above for one starting value, X would find every pair 1 < X < Y, where sum<=100, and running through it with all numbers 2-N would give a complete list of possible pairs.

For those interested, the problem I'm working through is the sum/product problem, described here (Second on the page)

If anyone could help with this it would be greatly appreciated!

Also, no built in prolog predicates are able to be used, hence the complicated way of doing this rather than with a findall.

A small extract of the output produced by this predicated is as follows:

[[5,6,11,30],[5,7,12,35],[5,8,13,40],[5,9,14,45],[5,10,15,50],[5,11,16,55],[5,12,17,60],[5,13,18,65],[5,14,19,70],[5,15,20,75],[5,16,21,80],[5,17,22,85],[5,18,23,90],[5,19,24,95],[5,20,25,100],[5,21,26,105],[5,22,27,110], ...

EDIT:

Ok, so after some editing, here is the latest version of my code.

I think it's very close, but there's still something not quite right.

It cycles through number pairs, but requires the use of ";" to view all the answers, which isn't what I want. Additionally, it returns false after all the answers are exhausted. I just can't figure it out.

Also, it gives a complete answer in the middle, but then removes a sublist each time until I'm left with only the last set of pairs.

E.g. genList(0,48,48,Q). gives me:

[[48,49,97,2352],[48,50,98,2400],[48,51,99,2448],[48,52,100,2496]]
[[48,49,97,2352],[48,50,98,2400],[48,51,99,2448],[48,52,100,2496],[49,50,99,2450],[49,51,100,2499]]
[[48,49,97,2352],[48,50,98,2400],[48,51,99,2448],[49,50,99,2450],[49,51,100,2499]]
[[48,49,97,2352],[48,50,98,2400],[49,50,99,2450],[49,51,100,2499]]
[[48,49,97,2352],[49,50,99,2450],[49,51,100,2499]]
[[49,50,99,2450],[49,51,100,2499]]
false.

As you can see, a sublist gets removed each time, I just can't see why!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can exploit Prolog backtracking here. Just state what you want. For example you could say:

  • I want X to be between 1 and 100.
  • I want Y to be between 1 and min(100 - X, X).
  • then I want their pair

Let's look at what a validPair/1 predicate would look like:

validPair(X-Y) :-
    between(1, 100, X),
    Limit is min(100 - X, X),
    between(1, Limit, Y).

You can just call it with

?- validPair(X).

and browse results with ;, or build a list of all the matching pairs with findall/3.

Edit: even with recursion, we can keep our statements:

  • I want X to be between 1 and 100.
  • I want Y to be between 1 and min(100 - X, X).
  • then I want their pair

So, an idea to do it would be to set up a worker predicate:

validPair(Result) :-
    validPair(0, 0, Result).
validPair(X, Y, R) :-
    ...

then set up the base case:

validPair(101, _Y, []) :- !.

and in the worker predicate, to implement the statements we made with some conditions:

validPair(X, Y, [SomeStuff|R]) :-
    X =< 100,
    Limit is min(100 - X, X),
    Y =< Limit,
    !,
    % we can go on and increment Y once we're finished
    validPair(X, NextY, R).
validPair(X, Y, R) :-
    % if we come here that means that Y is finished growing and
    % we have to increment X
    NextX is X + 1,
    validPair(NextX, 0, R).
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Ah yes, the thing is for this program we aren't allowed to use any prolog built-ins other than arithmetic and the cut- Probably should have mentioned that! –  XavierNuquos Apr 9 '12 at 13:41
    
Thanks Mog. This is nearly there, however the limiting factor here is that sum<= 100, not x<=100. I apologise since I noticed in my original post that a huge chunk was omitted : "The goal is to find every pair of numbers where sum<= 100. So running through the above for one starting value, X would find every pair 1 < X < Y, where sum<=100, and running through it with all numbers 2-N would give a complete list of possible pairs." I assume this is a formatting thing on the site, I intitially didn't have spaces between the "<" signs... –  XavierNuquos Apr 9 '12 at 14:31
    
Haha, I suppose not, it's just that in my attempts I've ended up with having "false" returned again like I had in my other question :( It's annoying because it's so close to what I need, but I just can't get it to work. Hmm, I'll try some more things and post back here if it's still not happening... –  XavierNuquos Apr 9 '12 at 14:40
    
actually you don't even have to add a condition before the cut. What I wrote was fine, since you pick up between 100 -X and 0 you can't go over 100. You just have to switch X and Y in your result and you're good –  m09 Apr 9 '12 at 14:43
    
Ah, got it now, thanks so much Mog you've been very helpful! –  XavierNuquos Apr 9 '12 at 15:09

I have a feeling you're tackling the problem the wrong way; I must admit I don't really understand what your predicate is doing.

The goal is to find every pair of numbers where sum<= 100.

Assuming you mean unordered pairs of non-negative integers, that's

between(0, 100, Sum),
between(0, Sum, X),
Y is Sum - X,
X =< Y.

The set of all such pairs (as a list) can then be constructed with findall/3.

You could also do this using CLP(fd):

use_module(library(clpfd)).
[X, Y, Sum] ins 0..100,
X #=< Y,
X + Y #= Sum,
label([X,Y,Sum]).
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