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I have table called posts in my DB. Each post has field called social_network

When I get all posts into array in my code I need to create instances for each one based on it's social_network field.

Right now I use switch statement for this but I don't like it as it is not flexible.

$posts = DataBase::getPosts(); // pseudocode
foreach($posts as $post) {
  switch($post->getSocialNetwork()){
    case 'Facebook':
      $social = new FacebookPost($post->getId());
      break;
    case 'Twitter':
      $social = new TwitterPost($post->getId());
      break;        
    // .... other social networks
  }
}
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how it is not flexible in what you are doing ? –  Sarfraz Apr 9 '12 at 14:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Add an interface to the classes FacebookPost and TwitterPost (eg SocialPostInterface) that has defined same basic necessary methods like getId(), postToNetwork() Then you can add as many new social networks as you want, without having to change this piece of code. They just have to implement the interface

Then experience the power of polymorhpism:

foreach ($posts as $post) {
    $className = $post->getSocialNetwork() . 'Post';
    // lets check if such class exists
    if (!class_exists($className, false /* do not attempt autoload */)) {
        throw new Exception("Unknown social network post class $className");
    }
    $social = new $className($post->getId());
    $social->doSomeStuffThatTheInterfaceHasDeclared();
}
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based on his code, he is already using polymorphism... also, PHP uses duck typing, there's no force to use a common ancestor or interface (though it is a good idea to use it as documentation) –  Karoly Horvath Apr 9 '12 at 14:30
    
Thank you, Capitan Obvious. That particular part is refactored to get rid of code duplication and ease the code maintenance. Nothing forces you to implement interfaces, that is true, but its rather easy to forget a method to implement without interface - it's used as documentation, as good practice, that will save him time and trouble. –  ddinchev Apr 9 '12 at 14:37
    
@DampeS8N, I edited the code. –  ddinchev Apr 9 '12 at 14:40
    
I am going to use this code in PostFactory class. Will it be right use? –  VitalyP Apr 9 '12 at 14:50
    
@DampeS8N my first comment was for Karoly Horvath, sorry for the missunderstanding. –  ddinchev Apr 9 '12 at 14:51

I dont think you can avoid this sort of code. however you may want to move it into an abstract factory, so you don't have to look at it in your controller.

$posts = DataBase::getPosts(); // pseudocode
foreach($posts as $post) {
    $social = SocialFactory::post($post);
  }
}
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this is just plain factory method - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factory_method_pattern –  Karoly Horvath Apr 9 '12 at 14:36
$socialClass = $post->getSocialNetwork() . 'Post';
$social = new $socialClass($post->getId());

You can make a new object from a string holding its name.

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