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How can it possible to get all names of some remote origin branches?

I started from --remote --list options, but got redundant origin/HEAD -> origin/master message and branches from the another origin.

$> git branch --remote --list
  origin/HEAD -> origin/master
  origin1/develop
  origin1/feature/1
  origin1/feature/2
  origin1/feature/3
  origin1/master
  origin2/develop
  origin2/feature/1
  origin2/feature/2
  origin2/master

Branches of specific origin could be matched with <pattern> option, but redundant message is still there. Actually that pattern is not really correct, because some origin's name could be a substring of another origin name, or even some branch.

$> git branch --remote --list origin1*
  origin1/HEAD -> origin/master
  origin1/develop
  origin1/feature/1
  origin1/feature/2
  origin1/feature/3
  origin1/master

What am I looking for is a list of branch names of origin1, any of them I could use for git checkout command. Something like that:

develop
feature/1
feature/2
feature/3
master

It's important that it should be done without grep, sed, tail or even ghc -e wrappers, only with true git power, because of their unsafeness and variation.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

It's important that it should be done without grep, sed, tail or even ghc -e wrappers, only with true git power, because of their unsafeness and variation.

That is only true for git porcelain commands (see "What does the term porcelain mean in Git?")

Use the plumbing command ls-remote, and then you will be able to filter its output.

ls-remote without parameter would still list the remote HEAD:

git@vonc-VirtualBox:~/ce/ce6/.git$ git ls-remote origin
8598d26b4a4bbe416f46087815734d49ba428523    HEAD
8598d26b4a4bbe416f46087815734d49ba428523    refs/heads/master
38325f657380ddef07fa32063c44d7d6c601c012    refs/heads/test_trap

But if you ask only for the heads of said remote:

git@vonc-VirtualBox:~/ce/ce6/.git$ git ls-remote --heads origin
8598d26b4a4bbe416f46087815734d49ba428523    refs/heads/master
38325f657380ddef07fa32063c44d7d6c601c012    refs/heads/test_trap

Final answer:

git@vonc-VirtualBox:~/ce/ce6/.git$ git ls-remote --heads origin  | sed 's?.*refs/heads/??'
master
test_trap

(Yes, it uses sed, but the output of a plumbing command is supposed to be stable enough to be parsed)

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Looks great. Thanks for exhaustive answer. –  ДМИТРИЙ МАЛИКОВ Apr 9 '12 at 17:33
    
I could've answer this too, but what happend with the "no sed" rule? lol, whatever –  KurzedMetal Apr 9 '12 at 19:10
    
@KurzedMetal true, but I carefully justified the use of sed by using only plumbing command, instead of a porcelain command like git branch. See for instance stackoverflow.com/questions/2978947/… or stackoverflow.com/questions/2976665/git-changelog-day-by-day/… –  VonC Apr 9 '12 at 21:06
    
Note that this requires network access (which git branch --remote --list does not) –  Johan Lundberg Nov 14 '13 at 19:58

I don't know if this is the answer you'd expect but you can get the list of branches listing the directory .git/refs/remotes/origin1

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1  
Firstly, it is not a git command. Secondly, it doesn't work at all, because non-tracked branches not listed there. –  ДМИТРИЙ МАЛИКОВ Apr 9 '12 at 15:33

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