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I have written the following code....It should convert a string like "88" to double value 88 and print it

void convertType(char* value)
{
   int i = 0;
   char ch;
   double ret = 0;
   while((ch = value[i] )!= '\0')
   {
      ret = ret*10 +(ch - '0');
      ++i;
   }
   printf("%d",ret);//or %f..what is the control string for double?
}



//input string :88

But it always prints 0...But when i change type of ret to int ...it works fine...when the type is float or double,it prints zero...so why am i getting this ambiguous results?

share|improve this question
1  
There's no such thing as a String in C ;-) – Aidanc Apr 9 '12 at 15:11
2  
"%f" or "%g" (or "%e" for exponential format) is used for both (float) and (double). – geekosaur Apr 9 '12 at 15:12
    
just forget about the title ..:) – Jinu Joseph Daniel Apr 9 '12 at 15:13
    
@geekosaur:ok...thanks – Jinu Joseph Daniel Apr 9 '12 at 15:13
    
@Aidanc it doesn't say String in the title... – Mr Lister Apr 9 '12 at 15:17

Use sscanf:

char str[] = "12345.56";
double d;

sscanf(str, "%lf", &d);

printf("%lf", d);
share|improve this answer
    
which is the header file/ – Jinu Joseph Daniel Apr 9 '12 at 15:16
    
stdio.h or cstdio for C++. – hauleth Apr 9 '12 at 15:35
1  
I disagree that this is a good answer. It doesn't solve the problem, and there was nothing wrong with OPs loop for parsing a string to a double. – abelenky Apr 9 '12 at 15:36
    
I don't tell that it is a wrong way, but it's reinventing a wheel (as we tell in Poland). – hauleth Apr 9 '12 at 15:37
    
+1 This saved me some trouble! Thanks a lot. – theGrayFox Oct 17 '13 at 14:41

You might be able to use atof() it returns a double.

source

share|improve this answer
3  
Make it strtod and I can upvote. – Mr Lister Apr 9 '12 at 15:15
    
i tried atof and strtod().. Both prints 0...worked only when type of ret changed to int – Jinu Joseph Daniel Apr 9 '12 at 15:16
    
@Jinu its not the problem with atof or strtod. Check my answer – Pavan Manjunath Apr 9 '12 at 16:03

But it always prints 0...But when i change type of ret to int ...it works fine...when the type is float or double,it prints zero.

Logic is fine. Just your format specifier is wrong. Change it to %f and all is well!

share|improve this answer
#define ZERO 48
#define NINE 57
#define MINUS 45
#define DECPNT 46

long strtolng_n(char* str, int n)
{
    int sign = 1;
    int place = 1;
    long ret = 0;

    int i;
    for (i = n-1; i >= 0; i--, place *= 10)
    {
        int c = str[i];
        switch (c)
        {
            case MINUS:
                if (i == 0) sign = -1;
                else return -1;
                break;
            default:
                if (c >= ZERO && c <= NINE) ret += (c - ZERO) * place;
                else return -1;
        }
    }

    return sign * ret;
}

double _double_fraction(char* str, int n)
{
    double place = 0.1;
    double ret = 0.0;

    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < n; i++, place /= 10)
    {
        int c = str[i];
        ret += (c - ZERO) * place;
    }
    return ret;
}
double strtodbl(char* str)
{
    int n = 0;
    int sign = 1;
    int d = -1;
    long ret = 0;

    char* temp = str;
    while (*temp != '\0')
    {
        switch (*temp)
        {
            case MINUS:
                if (n == 0) sign = -1;
                else return -1;
                break;
            case DECPNT:
                if (d == -1) d = n;
                else return -1;
                break;
            default:
                if (*temp < ZERO && *temp > NINE) return -1;
        }
        n++;
        temp++;
    }

    if (d == -1)
    {
        return (double)(strtolng_n(str, n));
    }
    else if (d == 0)
    {
        return _double_fraction((str+d+1), (n-d-1));
    }
    else if (sign == -1 && d == 1)
    {
        return (-1)*_double_fraction((str+d+1), (n-d-1));
    }
    else if (sign == -1)
    {
        ret = strtolng_n(str+1, d-1);
        return (-1) * (ret + _double_fraction((str+d+1), (n-d-1)));
    }
    else
    {
        ret = strtolng_n(str, d);
        return ret + _double_fraction((str+d+1), (n-d-1));
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The following code works for me.

#include <stdio.h>

void convertType(char* value);

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    char *str="0929";
    convertType(str);

    return  0;
}

void convertType(char* value) {
    double ret = 0;

    while(*value != '\0') {
        ret = ret*10 +(*value - '0');
        value++;
    }

    fprintf(stdout, "value: %f\n", ret);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This isn't exactly got to give a good answer for the input -.00314159E+003, is it? – Jonathan Leffler Jan 18 at 15:37

BTW: If you want a slightly faster, smaller version of your loop:

for( ; *value != '\0'; ret = 10*ret + *value++ - '0');
share|improve this answer

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