Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Define a procedure, same_structure, that takes two inputs. It should output True if the lists have the same structure, and False otherwise. Two values, p and q have the same structure if:

Neither p or q is a list.

Both p and q are lists, they have the same number of elements, and each
element of p has the same structure as the corresponding element of q.

EDIT: To make the picture clear the following are the expected output

same_structure([1, 0, 1], [2, 1, 2])
    ---> True
same_structure([1, [0], 1], [2, 5, 3])
    ---> False
same_structure([1, [2, [3, [4, 5]]]], ['a', ['b', ['c', ['d', 'e']]]])
    ---> True
same_structure([1, [2, [3, [4, 5]]]], ['a', ['b', ['c', ['de']]]])
    ---> False 

I thought recursion would be best to solve this problem in python I have come up with the following code but its not working.

def is_list(p):
    return isinstance(p, list)

 def same_structure(a,b):
    if not is_list(a) and not is_list(b):
        return True
    elif is_list(a) and is_list(b):
        if len(a) == len(b):
            same_structure(a[1:],b[1:])
    else:
        return False
share|improve this question
    
@SvenMarnach: unless I'm misreading the question, [2,(3,4)] and [2, (5,)] have the same structure: they're both lists, they have the same number of elements, and each element of p has the same structure as the corresponding element of q because neither is a list. IOW it's only the list structure that matters, the values don't (so that [2] and [3] have the same structure too.) – DSM Apr 9 '12 at 15:20
1  
Define "same structure" for a list as for python ['a', '1'] is not equal to ['1', 'a']. Maybe you'd be better using sets too. – KurzedMetal Apr 9 '12 at 15:24
    
In this context though I think I would say they contain the same elements, where equality is defined by the given relation. I think I had a question like this myself, back in the day. – DSM Apr 9 '12 at 15:37
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Recursion would be a good idea, but not the way you've suggested it. First off (and this may be only a typo), you don't actually return anything here:

if len(a) == len(b):
    same_structure(a[1:],b[1:])

Second, you should recursively deal with each element, not each sublist. ie.:

if len(a) == len(b):
    for i in range(len(a)):
        if not same_structure(a[i], b[i]):
            return False
    return True
else:
    return False

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

Instead of same_structure(a[1:],b[1:]), you need to check item pair of a and b one by one

def is_list(p):
    return isinstance(p, list)

def same_structure(a, b):
    if not is_list(a) and not is_list(b):
        return True
    elif (is_list(a) and is_list(b)) and (len(a) == len(b)):
        return all(map(same_structure, a, b)) # Here
    return False
share|improve this answer

You're missing one case, and forgot to return in the second case. Notice that is not necessary to explicitly compare the lengths of the lists, as the first case takes care of this - if one of the lists is empty and the other not, it's because one list had fewer elements than the other:

def same_structure(a, b):
    if a == [] or b == []:  # one of the lists is empty
        return a == b       # are both of the lists empty?
    elif is_list(a[0]) != is_list(b[0]):
        return False        # one of the elements is a list and the other is not
    elif not is_list(a[0]): # neither element is a list
        return same_structure(a[1:], b[1:])
    else:                   # both elements are lists
        return same_structure(a[0], b[0]) and same_structure(a[1:], b[1:])
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer but its not working because of integer comparison in second condition – user449355 Apr 9 '12 at 15:35
    
Kindly see expected output in question you will understand. – user449355 Apr 9 '12 at 15:36
    
@UmeshKacha the second condition?, you men this: is_list(a[0]) != is_list(b[0]). That's not an integer comparison, it's a boolean comparison. What that line says is: "if one of the elements is a list and the other is not a list, then return False, because the structure is different" – Óscar López Apr 9 '12 at 15:44
1  
@UmeshKacha as a matter of fact, I tested my solution with all of the examples in your question and it works perfectly, for all of them. – Óscar López Apr 9 '12 at 15:46

Since the specification says that the input are two lists, you can iterate the lists inside your function without further checks, and only do recursive calls if you encounter sublists:

def same_structure(a, b):
    if len(a) != len(b):
        return False
    return all(is_list(x) and is_list(y) and same_structure(x, y) or
               not is_list(x) and not is_list(y)
               for x, y in zip(a, b))
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.