Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given the following code :

typedef  int  array[4][4];

void transpose2(array dst, array src)
{
   int i, j;
   for ( i=0; i<4; i++) {
     for ( j=0; j<4; j++) {
         dst[i][j] = src[j][i];
     }
   }
}

Assumptions :

  • int is 4 bytes

  • src array starts at address 0 , dst starts at address 64

  • the size of the cache is 32 bytes , at the beginning the cache is empty

  • there is a L1 cache working under direct mapping using write-through, write-allocate

  • the size of the block is 16 bytes

I'm trying to figure out the cache miss & cache hit of dst and src .

The question - to fill in the tables of src and dst arrays , where they're empty at the beginning : Before the run

First I'll present the solution of my professor : After the run

Here is my solution , but somewhere, I'm making a mistake :

Assuming that I run i from 1 to 4 and not from 0 to 3

First iteration :

src  dst

1,1-> 1,1

2,1-> 1,2

3,1-> 1,3

4,1-> 1,4

Second iteration:

src    dst 
1,2 ->2,1

2,2 ->2,2

3,2 ->2,3

4,2 ->2,4

Third iteration:

src    dst 
1,3 -> 3,1

2,3 -> 3,2

3,3 -> 3,3

4,3 -> 3,4

Fourth iteration:

src    dst 
1,4 -> 4,1

2,4 -> 4,2

3,4 -> 4,3

4,4 -> 4,4

I don't understand why are there HITS at all at the tables of dst , I know that I'm wrong , can someone please explain why are there indeed HITS in the solution above ?

Regards Ron

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Because cache is usually organised into lines, each of size n bytes. When you access a particular memory address, that address along with the surrounding n-1 bytes are read into the cache.

share|improve this answer
    
I still can't see why are the four HITS indeed belong to their indexes , can you please explain ? –  ron Apr 9 '12 at 16:17
    
@ron: What are you expecting? –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 9 '12 at 16:21
    
Very simple , start at the beginning : 11 into 11 : it's a miss since the cache is empty . Now the cache has 11,12,13,14 . Next , 21 into 12 : the cache already has 12 then it's a HIT (understood!) . Cache still has only 11,12,13,14 . Next ,31 into 13 : the cache already has 13 , then it's a HIT from my understanding , but the answer says MISS. Why ? –  ron Apr 9 '12 at 17:10
    
@ron: You need to take into account the fact that it's a direct-mapped cache (that's what the question says). So that it makes it very easy for data to be evicted. Hint: you have two memory accesses on each iteration of the loop. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 9 '12 at 17:12
1  
@ron: Your understanding of the hits is already correct (your 2nd comment above). The only extra thing you have to take into account is that sometimes, accessing src will evict dst data from the cache, causing a miss for dst. I suggest figuring out which cache block is used for each dst and src access. From that, you can work out when evictions occur. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 11 '12 at 11:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.