Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm developing a Rest web service with WCF.

I have the following contract:

    namespace ADM.Contracts
    {
        [DataContract]
        public class FormContract
        {
            [DataMember]
            public int FormId { get; set; }

            [DataMember]
            public string FormName { get; set; }

            [DataMember]
            public List<BlockContract> blocks { get; set; }
        }

}

Sometimes, blocks are null and I send this JSON:

[
    {
        "FormId": 1,
        "FormName": "Formulario 1",
        "blocks": null
    },
    {
        "FormId": 2,
        "FormName": "Formulario 2",
        "blocks": null
    },
    {
        "FormId": 3,
        "FormName": "Formulario 3",
        "blocks": null
    }
]

Can I avoid sending "blocks": null?

I'm developing an Android client to parse JSON data. How can I deal with null?

share|improve this question
    
As a side note, do not use List on public API contract. Use IEnumerable or ICollection, or even IList if you really have to. –  Roman Royter Apr 9 '12 at 16:17
    
Why I can not use List? –  VansFannel Apr 9 '12 at 16:29
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should be able to avoid sending the default value of the list member (which is null) by adding to your DataMember attribute.

[DataMember(Name = "blocks", IsRequired=false, EmitDefaultValue=false)]
public List<BlockContract> blocks { get; set; }

However, keep in mind that null is a valid value in JSON and should be handled when there is the possibility that there could be no data attached to your entity. It could just be easier in your javascript to have an if condition like:

for(var i = 0; i < data.length; ++i) {
   if (data[i].blocks != null) {
      //do stuff
   } else {
      //no blocks. do other stuff
   }
}

Edit: I would like to point out that if you need to check if the data member in question has a blocks list defined, you will most likely have to go with the latter option of checking that the blocks member is not null.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You have a couple of options that I see.

  1. Keep sending nulls in the JSON and check for nullity client-side, handling it there.

  2. Check for nullity in your resource class and send something else instead (empty object, new object with empty fields, object with placeholder fields).

  3. Just don't include objects that are null. (ie send an object with FormId and FormName fields but no blocks field).

Whatever you choose it's important to communicate in your API what will happen if something doesn't exist. And be consistent.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.