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I have to quickly get an application that uses a Java Map to work properly. My program builds the map properly and my key class implements hashCode and equals (verified with @Override directives) and the map returns null every time I access using any key. The map has all appropriate values in it and I have verified all inputs to all functions and they appear to be correct. The only thing that is wrong is that the Map "get" function always returns null and the containsKey function always returns false even when the keys are in the map.

What's the simplest way to get a Map that does what it should and doesn't do what it should not do?

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closed as not a real question by Marek Sebera, assylias, Jarrod Roberson, duffymo, Andrew Thompson Apr 9 '12 at 17:44

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
you should check if the object you're passing as key actually returns true in an equality test –  Dan Apr 9 '12 at 16:26
2  
You should post a SSCCE rather than explaining what you do with words. –  assylias Apr 9 '12 at 16:28
    
You claimed to have 'verified' that the data is in the map. How did you do that? That answer should solve your problem. –  kasavbere Apr 9 '12 at 16:29
    
without the actual code, this will get closed very quickly! –  Jarrod Roberson Apr 9 '12 at 16:31
    
"properly" - apparently not. –  duffymo Apr 9 '12 at 16:32

1 Answer 1

Java hashmaps work correctly. If they did not, about 30% of all developers would be screaming in agony, frustration, rage, or pain.

Try verifying that you place the items in the hashmap prior to querying them. If you fail to do, put(key, value) then you won't get anything back when you query with get(key). Also note that your key is what makes the selection in the Map, so if you are overriding equals(...) and hashCode() in the value side of the map, that's not the side that is getting used. equals(...) and hashCode() are getting called on the key side of the Map.

Try using a unit test framework to prove to yourself that your equals and hashmap really do work correctly. I recomment TestNG, and here are a few tutorials to get you started.

Your test code should look include something like

@Test
public void testKeyEquality() {
        MyObject key1 = new MyObject("one");
        MyObject key2 = new MyObject("one");
        assert key1.equals(key2);
        assert key2.equals(key1);
}

@Test
public void testEqualKeyHashcodes() {
        MyObject key1 = new MyObject("one");
        MyObject key2 = new MyObject("one");
        assert key1.hashCode() == key2.hashCode();
}

@Test
public void testKeyNotEquals() {
        MyObject key1 = new MyObject("one");
        MyObject key2 = new MyObject("two");
        assert !key1.equals(key2);
        assert !key2.equals(key1);
}

@Test
public void testKeyNotEqualHashcode() {
        MyObject key1 = new MyObject("one");
        MyObject key2 = new MyObject("two");
        assert key1.hashCode() != key2.hashCode();
}

@Test
public void testKeyEqualsItself() {
        MyObject key1 = new MyObject("one");
        assert key1.equals(key1);
}

@Test
public void testKeyHashcodeEqualsItself() {
        MyObject key1 = new MyObject("one");
        assert key1.hashCode() == key1.hashCode();
}

@Test
public void testKeyTransitivity() {
        MyObject key1 = new MyObject("one");
        MyObject key2 = new MyObject("one");
        MyObject key3 = new MyObject("one");
        if (key1.equals(key2) && key2.equals(key3)) {
          assert key1.equals(key3);
        }
        if (key2.equals(key3) && key3.equals(key1)) {
          assert key2.equals(key1);
        }
        if (key3.equals(key1) && key1.equals(key2)) {
          assert key3.equals(key2);
        }
        if (key3.equals(key2) && key2.equals(key1)) {
          assert key3.equals(key1);
        }
        if (key2.equals(key1) && key1.equals(key3)) {
          assert key2.equals(key3);
        }
        if (key1.equals(key3) && key3.equals(key2)) {
          assert key1.equals(key2);
        }
}

    // you implement the hashcode version of transitivity as an exercise

I promise you, if your object can pass these tests, it will be a good key.

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Learning how to write tests for your own code is one of the most valuable skills a programmer can foster. Start unit testing early, it will pay off for the rest of your life. Look to TestNG to start, or perhaps JUnit. JUnit is more popular, but I believe TestNG to be a better tool. –  Edwin Buck Apr 9 '12 at 16:35

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