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I was just looking into the memory allocation of a program in C. I know that all the global and static variables are stored in a heap. Also, the stack stores all the function calls. I do have one doubt here though. Say I am calling the following function:

int ret;
int num = 10;
int arr[3] = {1,2,3};
int *ptr = &arr[0];
ret = giveNumber(num, ptr);

Here, I read that the parameters of the function call giveNumer() would also be stored in the same stack. But in what order will they be stored? If I popped the top of stack, which parameter will be popped first, num or ptr?

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Depends on your architecture and has nothing to do with your debugger. – Mat Apr 9 '12 at 17:12
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I know that all the global and static variables are stored in a heap.
No, thats not true.
As per the standard they are stored in implementation defined memory regions, typically the Data segment and the BSS.

If I popped the top of stack, which parameter will be popped first, num or ptr
The order of evaluation of arguments to a function is Unspecified.
So it depends on your compiler implementation. An compiler might evaluate the arguments from:

  • Left to Right or
  • Right to Left or
  • Any other random order

So the behavior & order you see would depend on this.

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Adding to what @Als has already mentioned, most of the compilers on x86 follow _cdecl calling convention where arguments are evaluated from right to left. Learn more here

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/X86_Disassembly/Calling_Conventions#Standard_C_Calling_Conventions

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