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I have a fortran code being compiled in gfortran (several thousand lines so I'll try to post the important lines) that gives me:

nrev(isat)=dint((t_ref-t_in)/zper)+1
           1
Warning:Possible change of value in conversion from REAL(8) to INTEGER(4) at (1)

They are initialized as:

integer*4  nrev(nmaxsat)
integer*4  isat
real*8     t_ref
real*8     t_in
real*8     zper

Any ideas on how to fix this? Thanks!

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What do you want to fix, exactly? Depending on the magnitude of the double precision expression, it won't be representable as a 32 bit signed integer. What are you expecting to happen? –  talonmies Apr 9 '12 at 18:21
    
When I run the full program all of the output values are NaN, so I am concerned warnings like this are the issue. I have no errors when compiling in gfortran, however it compiles and runs correctly when compiled in g77. I have several of these warnings but am focusing on this one hoping if I can get help with one I can figure out the rest. –  Astro_21 Apr 9 '12 at 18:28
    
If you are getting NaN values, that means you have an invalid floating point calculation somewhere. The code you have shown is calculating an integer value. It is impossible to say how the two might be related based on what you have posted. –  talonmies Apr 9 '12 at 18:40
    
I am pretty new to programming and completely new to Fortran...what do you mean by invalid floating point? Is this something that could have been caused by the version change from g77 to gfortran? And while I'm thinking about it do you know what the difference between "Possible change of value in conversion" and the "type mismatch in argument" warnings is? They seem to be saying the same thing two different ways... Thanks again! –  Astro_21 Apr 9 '12 at 18:57
    
Invalid means an operation which is not representable as a real number within the range of the floating point type you are using. The usual culprits are division by zero, taking the logarithm or square root of a negative real value. Another possibility is using a value without assigning it a value. Some compilers will automatically zero values, others won't. The standard does not define whether it is required to initialize values implicitly or not. –  talonmies Apr 9 '12 at 19:17
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1 Answer

It's an excellent idea to get rid of all warnings, even minor ones -- even if only so that when you do get more significant issues, you see them rather than having the output swamped by little things.

In this case, the warning message is fairly clear; you're assigning a double to an integer. The dint intrinsic truncates, but it doesn't convert types; so you're assigning a double precision value that's had it's value truncated to an integer. You could rightly note that the intrinsic is confusingly named, but...

If you want to do the conversion as well as the truncation, idint actually converts to an integer.

So for instance this program

program foo

    integer :: nrev
    double precision :: t_ref

    t_ref  = 1.

    nrev = dint(t_ref)

end program foo

creates the same warning:

$ gfortran -o foo foo.f90 -Wall -std=f95
foo.f90:8.11:

    nrev = dint(t_ref)
           1
Warning: Possible change of value in conversion from REAL(8) to INTEGER(4) at (1)

But this one is fine:

program foo

    integer :: nrev
    double precision :: t_ref

    t_ref  = 1.

    nrev = idint(t_ref)

end program foo

as we see:

$ gfortran -o foo foo.f90 -Wall -std=f95
$ 
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6  
Instead of using the specific intrinsic "idint", you can use the generic name "int". With the generic, the compiler automatically figures out which function to use from the type of the argument & the programmer doesn't have to remember the name. (Also there is a second argument in which you can specify the type of the integer returned by the function.) –  M. S. B. Apr 10 '12 at 0:53
    
Thank you so much for that explanation! This will help me clean up this code a lot and make it run much better. I asked this in an above comment but can you explain what the difference between "Possible change of value in conversion" and the "type mismatch in argument" warnings is? They seem to me to be saying the same thing two different ways... Thanks again! –  Astro_21 Apr 10 '12 at 13:33
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